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Full text of "Ranger"

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It has been said that the college years are the best years of our lives. 
This has been said of almost every phase of human progress. 

There are the simple, and therefore immense, joys of childhood, and the 
stirring and exciting self discovery of adolescence. In the future we can 
anticipate the confidence and security of middle age, and the contentment 
of retirement. 

So too, we have pleasant memories of the college years. We may fondly 
recall the many achievements which have come our way during this time. 

But it is not the pleasant memories of which the best years are made. It 
is the fact that what we have learned during these best years will make all 
the coming years better ones. 

It is the purpose of the 1957 Ranger to present a true picture of life at 
Regis College, but in our feeble attempts we realize that that which has made 
these the best years of our lives cannot be photographed or described with 
words, for that elusive element is living the life of Regis. 

In these pages we hope to remind those who have had this privilege of 
some pleasant occurrences which are a part of Regis life. To those who have 
not had this privilege, we wish to convey some idea of why it is that these 
years spent at Regis are truly the best years of our lives. 



®*U 



CO-EDITORS 

Jack Treloar 

Eugene O'Neal 
BUSINESS MANAGER 

Harry Quadracci 

ASSISTANT BUSINESS MANAGER 

Terry Welsh 
FACULTY EDITOR 

Mike Kline 

CLASS EDITOR 

James O'Connor 

ORGANIZATIONS EDITOR 

Eugene O'Neal 
ACTIVITIES EDITOR 

Hank Close 



SPORTS EDITOR 
Robert Britt 

FEATURE ED'TOE 
James O'Connor 

GENERAL STAFF 
Mike Erhard 
John Cambria 
Sid Blubaugh 
Ed Moorhead 

ADVERTISING 
Ray Nass 

PHOTOGRAPHERS 
Bob Luckenbach 
Jim Sambol 

STAFF ARTIST 
Tom Dean 



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Reverend Joseph V. Downey, S. J. 




Teacher, scientist, mathematician, 

Theologian, philosopher, seismologist; 

A quiet man, 

Whose many accomplishments are overshadowed 

Only by his humility 

And willingness to use his many talents 

For the benefit of others. 

Explaining the intricate theories 

Of nuclear physics, 

Or counseling some young man 

On almost any matter, 

He is always the teacher, 

Always the friend, 

Always the Jesuit priest. 



It is with the deepest gratitude for many things which he has done for each 
Regis student that we proudly dedicate the 1957 RANGER to Father Joseph Downey, SJ. 




FATHER DOWNEY IN REGIS SEISMOLOGICAL STATION WHICH HE MAINTAINS. 



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INVERITATE ET CARITATE 
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AnciiUdwfL Ionian Jj. VeUi 



My sincere congratulations to the Regis college graduates 
of '57. With the precious opportunities given you by reason 
of your educational background, you must be ready to assume 
the responsibilities of adult leadership. Time and Experience 
will mature and develop your theoretic information, and may 
success follow your endeavors in your chosen fields of labor. 
Remain loyal to the high ideals of conduct your religious 
education has given you. 



Assist actively in civic movements that promise the betterment 
of your community and the amelioration of poverty and dis- 
tress. May Almighty God bless the years ahead and may 
your life and work merit His commendation. 
Urban J. Vehr 



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Archbishop of Denver 



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Pteiidetit 



PneU^M-nt'l MeHage 



Expansion has become a reality at Regis College but it is not physical 
expansion that determines the worth of a college or university. 

Only with the passing of years and the accomplishments of its graduates 
can an educational institution measure its successes and its failures. Buildings 
can add comforts and conveniences. They can provide additional facilities to 
enroll more students. They can increase the monetary value of a school and 
enrich the beauty of its campus. 

But for all their concrete and steel and glass they cannot add one fraction 
to the true value of a school. They cannot develop a thinking, articulate, re- 
sponsible man, cognizant of his obligations to God and his fellow men. 

Too many people regard graduation from a college or a university as the 
termination of their education. In reality, it is merely the end of one phase of 
what should be a lifelong process of intellectual and spiritual growth and ma- 
turity. It is the end of the formal phase of education. It is the beginning of 
another, equally important phase. In the years ahead, you must learn to use 
the facts, ideals, and abilities which you have acquired, and you must learn 
to use them wisely. 

We have endeavored to provide you with the tools you will need to fashion 
your salvation and mold yourself into a constructive, responsible citizen. We 
have also endeavored to instill motivation for the use of these tools. "Seek you 
first the kingdom of God." 

As we watch you leave Regis we can take pride in the knowledge that the 
wide-spread materialism and godlessness of the world today will not find a place 
in your lives. May God prosper you always. 




President 
Regis College 



DIRECTOR OF EVENING CLASSES 




Mr. John V. Coyne 



ASST. DIRECTOR OF 
EVENING CLASSES 




Rev. Harold L. Stansell, S.J. 



R.e*fU Goltetfe 



ASST. TO PRESIDENT 




Mr. Martin C. Kelly 



ATHLETIC DIRECTOR 




Mr. John A. Flanagan 



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SUPERINTENDENT OF 

BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 



REGISTRAR 



Rev. John J. Gibbons, SJ. 



LIBRARIAN 




TREASURER 




CHAPLAIN 




Rev. Walter F. Harris, SJ. 



Mr. Adrian N. Dorzweiler 



DIRECTOR OF 
PUBLIC RELATIONS 




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Mr. Charles J. Baier 

M.A., Instructor in History 



Mr. George Eric Bechtolf 

M.A., Assoc. Prof, of Languages 



Rev. Louis A. Bloomer 

S.J., M.A., Professor of English 



Rev. Robert R. Boyle 

S.J., Ph.D., Instructor in 
English 



Rev. Lucius F. Cervantes 

S.J., M.A., Ph.D., Assoc. 
Prof, of Sociology 



Rev. Joseph J. Collins 

S.J., M.A., Instructor in 
Philosophy 



Rev. Christian L. Bonnet 

S.J., M.A., Ph.L, S.T.L. 
Assoc. Prof, of Philosophy 




"Go, therefore, and make disciples of all 
nations, baptizing them in the name of 
the Father, and of the Son, and of the 
Holy Spirit." 

— New Testament 



Rev. Fred T. Daly 

S.J., M.S., Asst. Prof, of 
Mathematics 




Rev. John J. Jolin 
S.J., M.A., Ph.D., Asst. 
Prof, of Classical Languages 




'& > &\ 



Rev. Charles F. Kruger 

S.J., M.A., A.B.L.S. 
Asst. Prof, of Speech 



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Mr. Harvey E. Moore 

B.S., Instructor in 
Physical Education 



Rev. John F. Lyons 

S.J., M.A., Instructor in English 



Miss Ann Laughlin 

LL.D. Hon. 

Lecturer in Sociology 




Rev. Anthony J. Rochel 

S.J., M.S., Instructor in Physics 



Rev. John J. Quirk 

S.J., M.A., Asst. Prof, of 
Modern Languages 



Mr. Peter A. Rotar 

B.A., M.B.A., Asst. Prof, in 
Business Administration 



Mr. Francis J. Ozog 

B.S., Ph.D., Asst. 
Prof, of Chemistry 



Rev. Joseph A. Ryan 

S.J., M.A., Professor of 
Accounting 




Rev. Edward Wintergalen 

S.J., M.A., M.S.C. 
Assoc. Prof, of Economics 




O^ice, 




Miss Rosemary Frank 



Mrs. Mary Peck and Mr. Paul Dougherty 




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Miss Ann Larson 



Rosemary displays the best-sellers. 




Brother Renk S.J. 







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Senior i 




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Thirteen seniors, the largest number in the history of Regis, were 
elected to the 1956-57 edition of Who's Who In American Colleges 
and Universities. 

These men were selected on the basis of their scholarship, co- 
operation, and leadership in academic and extra-curricular activities. 

These men were selected by a general vote of the faculty. 



TIMOTHY HARRINGTON 




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THOMAS HOOGERWERF 



MARTIN HART 



MERLIN HELLMAN 
EDWARD KELLY 






MAURICE O'CONNOR 



RONALD SIMPSON 



THOMAS STALEY 







f\anaer ^rward 



9 



This award is given by the Ranger staff to John 
Kirchner and Harry Quadracci, who by their interest, 
cooperation, and school spirit, deserve recognition for 
their contribution to Regis College. 




dSrown CX Ljold -^tward 



JOHN KIRCHNER 



The Brown and Gold Outstanding Senior Award for 1957 was presented to James P. Drinkard, a philosophy major, 
who maintained a perfect scholastic record during his four years at Regis. 

Honorable mention for the Brown and Gold Outstanding Senior Award was given to Daniel R. Riordan who has been 
active in student government and fraternity affairs since his Freshman year. Another recipient of the honorable mention 
was Paul Erramouspe who has served as an officer of his class, his fraternity, and the student council. 



PAUL ERRAMOUSPE 



JAMES P. DRINKARD 



DANIEL P. RIORDAN 









Class President 

Louis W. DePaemelere 

Casper, Wyoming 

B.S. in Accounting 

A K Psi Secretary; Debate Society 

Denver Club; Glee Club President; 

Italian Club; Vet's Club President; 

Variety Club; Band; Dean's list. 



Vice-President 

John F. Evans 

Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 
B.S. in Mathematics 



Secretary-Treasurer 

Leo P. Cremins 

University City, Missouri 

B.S. in Business Administration 

A D G Vice-President; Class officer; 

Missouri Club officer; "R" Club; Ski 

team; Vice-President. 



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Student Council Representative 
Eugene F. Sweeney 

Strasburg, Colorado 

B.S. in Accounting 

A K Psi officer; Class officer; St. John 

Berchmans Society President; Band; 

Dean's list. 



Student Council Alternate 

Richard F. Henry 
Tulsa, Oklahoma 
B.S. in Sociology 

A D G; Brown and Gold; Class offi- 
cer; Oklahoma Club; Spanish Club, 
Sodality. 




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Horace J. Anderson 
Denver, Colorado 
B.S. in Chemistry- 
Biology club; Dean's list. 



Thomas L. Arms 
Minneapolis, Minn. 



Claude Arnold 
Denver, Colorado 
B.S. in Business Administration 



£>eni&i. 



George P. Ashcroft 
Littleton, Colorado 
B.S. in Business Administration 
Alpha Kappa Psi; Denver Club; Vets 
Club. 



Paul Beacom 

South Sioux City, Nebraska 
B.S. in Business Administration 
Circle K; Vet's Club; Dean's list. 





FEMALE 




roe B. Bischof 
Pinckneyville, Illinois 



William Brcainan 
Denver, Colorado 
B.A. in Philosophy 



James N. Brown 

Thermopolis, Wyoming 
B.S. in Business Administration 
Alpha Kappa Psi; I.R.C.; St. John 
Berchman's Society; Wyoming Club; 
Dean's list. 



GlaAb 



James S. Bzdek 
Denver, Colorado 
B.S. in English 

Dramatic Club; St. John Berchman's 
Society; Dean's list; Literary Club. 



Richard O. Campbell 
Denver, Colorado 
B.S. in History 

History Club; I.R.C.; Sec-Treas.; Span- 
ish Club; Sodality; Dean's list. 




GUEST!!! 





Gerald C. Caron 

Colorado Springs, Colorado 
B.S. in History 

Brown and Gold; Sports Editor; His- 
tory Club; I.R.C.; "R" Club; Spanish 
Club; Sodality; Varsity Baseball; Lit- 
erary Club. 



Charles J. Carroll 
Denver, Colorado 
B.S. in Accounting 



Donald A. Cerrone 
Denver, Colorado 
B.S. in Biology 

Biology Club; Italian Club; Dean's 
list. 



£em&i 



Robert H. Chauvin 
Denver, Colorado 
B.S. in Business Administration 
Alpha Kappa Psi; Biology Club; 
Circle K President; Vet's club; Dean's 
list. 



Leonard V. Collins 
Denver, Colorado 
B.S. in Business Administration 
"R" Club; Varsity Baseball; Vet's 
Club. 





HARD 




Paul E. Cooper 
Denver, Colorado 



John J. Culig 
Pueblo, Colorado 
B.S. in Business Administration 
Alpha Kappa Psi; St. John Berch- 
man's Society; Sodality. 



James N. Cushner 
Denver, Colorado 
B.S. in Business Administration 
Alpha Kappa Psi; Circle K: Treas- 
urer; Vet's Club; Dean's list. 



GlaAi 



Thomas J. Danahey 
Denver, Colorado 
B.S. in Natural Science 
Biology Club; Student Council Repr.; 
Denver Club; Dramatic Club; So- 
dality; Ski Club; Student Council; 
Dean's list; Student Instructor 
Biology. 



William J. Deline 
Denver, Colorado 
B.S. in Business Administration 
Alpha Delta Gamma; "R" Club; Var- 
sity Baseball. 




TIMES 








James P. Drinkard 
Denver, Colorado 
B.S. in Philosophy 

Biology Club; Denver Club; Dra- 
matic Club; Student Council Director; 
Who's Who; Dean's list. 



Joseph A. Dunn 

Milwaukee, Wisconsin 

B.S. in Economics 

Alpha Delta Gamma; Dramatic Club; 

Milwaukee Club; "R" Club; Ski Club. 



Arthur L. Durand 
Aurora, Colorado 
B.S. in Mathematics 
Glee Club. 



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Richard L. Eckhard 
St. Louis, Missouri 
B.S. in Business Administration 
Missouri Club; "R" Club; Varsity 
Basketball. 



Thomas E. Elnen 
Wichita, Kansas 
B.S. in Sociology 

Aquinas Academy; Brown and Gold; 
Spanish Club; Sodality. 





PROM 




Paul Erramouspe 
Rock Springs, Wyoming 
B.S. in Accounting 
Alpha Kappa Psi; History Club; St. 
John Berchman's Society President; 
Sodality Treas.; Student Council 
Treasurer; Who's Who; Dean's list. 



Thomas F. Fania 
Ironton, Missouri 

Biology Club; Missouri Club; Vet's 
Club. 



Norbert V. Fehringer 
Peetz, Colorado 
B.S. in Chemistry 

Rho Chi Sigma; St. John Berchman's 
Society; Vet's Club; Wyoming Club. 



Glau 



Paul J. Foley 
Wichita, Kansas 

Alpha Kappa Psi Master of Ritual; 
KREG Radio President. 



John Garbella 
Denver, Colorado 
B.S. in Social Sciences 
Denver Club; Dramatic Club; "R" 
Club; Varsity Basketball Manager. 




NIGHT 





Charles K. Gersbach 
Larchmont, New York 
B.S. in Economics 

Alpha Delta Gamma Pledgemaster; 
Brown and Gold; Dramatic Club; Cir- 
cle K Secretary; Sodality; Ski Club; 
Student Council; Who's Who; Dean's 
list. 



Bert D. Gilbert 
Denver, Colorado 
B.S. in English 
Vet's Club. 



Robert W. Gonring 
Denver, Colorado 
Dean's list. 



Robert A. Gottschalk 
Denver, Colorado 



John E. Graham 
Galesburg, Illinois 
B.S. in Economics 

Alpha Delta Gamma Sergeant-at- 
Arms; Brown and Gold; Ski Club; 
Varsity basketball manager. 



<&##*4 





CORONATION 



-<K 








Timothy J. Harrington 
Milwaukee, Wisconsin 
Alpha Delta Gamma Historian; 
Brown and Gold; Milwaukee Club; 
"R" Club; Spanish Club President; 
Ski Club; Student Council President; 
Who's Who. 



Daniel G. Harris 
Bennett, Colorado 
B.S. in Chemistry 
Rho Chi Sigma; Sodality. 



Martin Hart 

Denver, Colorado 

B.S. Accounting 

Alpha Kappa Psi; Who's Who; Band. 



GlaU 



Merlin J. Hellman 
Houghton, Iowa 

B.S. in Business Administration 
Alpha Kappa Psi Vice-President; Cir- 
cle K; Debate Society; Glee Club 
Vice-President; St. John Berchman's 
Society; Sodality; Who's Who; 
Dean's list; Carroll Hall Prefect. 



Thomas T. Hoogerwerf 
Moline, Illinois 

B.S. in Business Administration 
Class officer; Student Council Direc- 
tor; "R" Club; Varsity Basketball; 
Who's Who; Dean's list. 




BALL 





Allen E. Hower 
Littleton, Colorado 
B.S. in Mathematics 
"R" Club President; Varsity Basket- 
ball. 



Paul I. Iten 

Le Sueur, Minnesota 

B.S. in Business Administration 

Alpha Kappa Psi; Circle K; Vet's 

Club. 



James F. Jagger 
Pueblo, Colorado 
B.S. in Accounting 
Alpha Kappa Psi President; Circle K. 



Edward J. Kelly 
Leadville, Colorado 
B.S. in Accounting 

Alpha Kappa Psi; Treasurer; Brown 
and Gold; Glee Club; "R" Club; St. 
John Berchmans Society; Ski Club; 
Ski team; Who's Who; Dean's list; 
Literary Club. 



Semc^ 



John Kirchner 
Kansas City, Missouri 
B.S. in Mathematics 
Debate Society President; Missouri 
Club President; Ranger; St. John 
Berchman's Society; Sodality 
President. 





TONY RENDULICH 




Rudolph D. Kochevar 
Pueblo, Colorado 
B.S. in Economics 
Dean's list. 



Eugene L. Lamansky 
Denver, Colorado 
B.S. in Accounting 

Alpha Kappa Psi; Circle K; Vet's 
Club; President; Dean's list; Sports- 
man's Club. 



Joe M. Lardino 
Oak Park, Illinois 
B.S. in Sociology" 
Chicago Club; "R" 
Baseball; Dean's list. 



Club; Varsity 



GlaM 



John L. Larson 
Denver, Colorado 
B.S. in English 

Brown and Gold; Circle K; Director; 
Denver Club; Dramatic Club; Ski 
Club; Frosh Basketball; Literary 
Circle. 



Emanuel S. Lawbaugh, Jr. 
St. Mary's, Missouri 
B.S. in English 

Alpha Delta Gamma; Brown and 
Gold; Missouri Club; Ranger; St. John 
Berchmans Society; Sodality; Varsity 
Baseball; Frosh Basketball; Dean's 
list; Future Teachers of America; 
President. 




RECEIVES A.D.G. AWARD 





Larry H. Lekic 
Aguilar, Colorado 
B.S. in Accounting 



Richard F. Lutz 
Denver, Colorado 

Denver Club; Glee Club; History 
Club; I.R.C.; Future Teachers of 
America. 



Terrance B. McCarty 
Denver, Colorado 



£>eniffl, 



Thomas H. May 
Denver, Colorado 
B.S. in History 



John M. Meek 
Denver, Colorado 
B.S. in Philosophy 

Biology Club President; Debate So- 
ciety Treasurer; Denver Club; Glee 
Club Treasurer; Ski Club; Dean's list; 
Literary Club. 





SENIORS 





Warren C. Meidl 
Denver, Colorado 

Alpha Kappa Psi; Glee Club; "R" 
Club; Ski Club. 



James P. Minogue 

Minneapolis, Minnesota 

B.S. in Economics 

Alpha Kappa Psi; Ski Club. 



Edward L. Moorhead 
Wilmette, Illinois 
B.S. in Philosophy 

Biology Club; Brown and Gold 
Columnist; Chicago Club President; 
Ranger; Student Council Vice-Presi- 
dent; Varsity Baseball; Dean's list. 



GlaM 



William A. Moss 

Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 

B.S. in English 

Brown and Gold; Literary Club; Ok 

lahoma Club. 



Charles L. Murphy 
Colorado Springs, Colorado 
B.S. in Sociology 

Debate Society; Dramatic Club; So- 
dality; Dean's list; Ice Hockey Team. 




STUDY??? 





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Max E. Nelson 
Columbia, Utah 
B.S. in Accounting 
Vet's Club. 



Maurice E. O'Connor 
Council Bluffs, Iowa 
B.S. in Natural Science 
Biology Club President; Class officer; 
Student Council Rep.; Brown and 
Gold; Debate Society; Ranger; St. 
John Berchmans Society; Sodality; 
Student Council Vice-President; 
Who's Who; Dean's list; Iowa Club. 



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Tony I. Oreskovich 
Pueblo, Colorado 
B.S. in English 

Biology Club; History Club; St. John 
Berchmans Society; Sodality; Student 
Council; Varsity Baseball; Dean's 
list; Varsity Basketball. 



Mentirt, 



Dan F. O'Rourke 
Tulsa, Oklahoma 
B.S. in Business Administration 
Alpha Kappa Psi; Glee Club; Okla- 
homa Club; Sodality; Ski Club. 



William E. O'Toole 
Denver, Colorado 





SENIOR 



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Gerald A. Peters 
Denver, Colorado 



Donald F. Ploussard 
Denver, Colorado 
B.S. in History- 
History Club; Vice-President; Italian 
Club; Spanish Club; Vet's Club; 
Dean's list. 



John A. Plumb, Jr. 
Denver, Colorado 
B.S. in Business Administration 
Alpha Delta Gamma; Treasurer; 
Circle K; Vice-President; Denver 
Club; Dramatic Club. 



GlaM 



Harry V. Quadracci 
Milwaukee, Wisconsin 
A.B. in Philosophy 
Alpha Delta Gamma; Pledgemaster; 
Milwaukee Club; Ranger Business 
manager; St John Berchmans So- 
ciety; Spanish Club; Sodality; Dean's 
list; Literary Club; Band; Ranger 
Award. 



Anthony P. Rendulich 
Rillton, Pennsylvania 
B.S. in Philosophy 

"R" Club; Basketball; Future Teach- 
ers of America; A D G Award. 




FROSH 










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Arden R. Reusink 
Denver, Colorado 
B.S. in History 
Rho Chi Sigma; Literary Club. 



Dale G. Ries 

Los Angeles, California 
Alpha Delta Gamma 



Daniel R. Riordan 

Milwaukee, Wisconsin 
B.S. in History 

Alpha Delta Gamma President; Class 
officer; Milwaukee Club; St. John 
Berchmans Society; Spanish Club 
Treasurer; Student Council Represen- 
tative. 



cW(W 



Manuel Rosado 
Puerto Rico 
B.S. in Philosophy 
Aguinas Academy; Dramatic Club; 
Glee Club; History Club; St. John 
Berchmans Society; Spanish Club; 
Dean's list. 



William Rodgers 
Denver, Colorado 





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Arthur V. Rossi 
Denver, Colorado 



Richard J. Rydberg 
Denver, Colorado 
B.S. in Biology 

Biology Club; President; Brown and 
Gold; Rho Chi Sigma; Student Coun- 
cil Representative; Student Council; 
Vet's Club; Dean's list; Variety Club. 



William R. Sanders 
Wichita, Kansas 
B.S. in Business Administration 
Alpha Kappa Psi; Dramatic Club. 



Clate 




Gerald E. Schmitt 
Rock Island, Dlinois 
Alpha Delta Gamma; pledge captain; 
Student Council director. 



Edwin A. Sena 
Denver, Colorado 



DON'T SAY! 





Wallace C. Shannon 
Wauwatosa, Wisconsin 
B.S. in Business Administration 
Alpha Delta Gamma; Circle K; Mil- 
waukee Club; Ski Club. 



Ronald J. Simpson 
Denver, Colorado 
B.S. in Sociology- 
Brown and Gold; Denver Club; His- 
tory Club; Who's Who; Dean's list. 



Eugene L. Smaldone 
Denver, Colorado 

Denver Club; History Club; Italian 
Club; Spanish Club. 



a>emc^i 



John Spensieri 
Denver, Colorado 
B.S. in Business Administration 
Circle K; Vet's Club; Dean's list. 



Tom Staley 

Tulsa, Oklahoma 
B.S. in English 

Alpha Delta Gamma; Brown and 
Gold; Oklahoma Club; "R" Club; So- 
dality; Varsity Baseball; Who's Who; 
Literary Club. 





"TRUE 




Robert E. Sutton 
Denver, Colorado 
B.S. in Philosophy 
Aquinas Academy; Brown and Gold; 
Denver Club; Dramatic Club; History 
Club; I.R.C.; "R" Club; Dean's list. 



Ronald Stainbrook 
Littleton, Colorado 



Edward J. Tanguay 
Denver, Colorado 
A.B. in Philosophy 



ClaM, 




John Tanner 

Denver, Colorado 

B.S. in Accounting 

Circle K; Italian Club; Band. 



Leonard D. Vostrejs 
Denver, Colorado 
B.S. in Accounting 

Circle K; Italian Club; Band; Denver 
Club. 



LOVE" 





Harold J. Wanebo 
Denver, Colorado 
B.S. in Chemistry 

Alpha Delta Gamma Secretary; Bi- 
ology Club; Denver Club; Dramatic 
Club; Ski Club; Dean's list. 



Robert P. Wick 

Milwaukee, Wisconsin 
B.S. in Business Administration 
Alpha Delta Gamma; Circle K; Mil- 
waukee Club; Ski Club; Golf Team. 



Charles L. Woodward 
Denver, Colorado 
B.S. in English 

Biology Club; Sodality; President; Ski 
Club; Student Council; Dean's list; 
N.S.A. Representative; President In- 
tercollegiate Sodality Union. 



William G. Zook 
Denver, Colorado 
B.S. in Accounting 
Alpha Kappa Psi; Denver Club. 



^>emo^i GlaM 





INSPIRATION 



"^■■■■^■BK 




"Well, at least it was paid for 



r^W 

* 

^^^ 




^4ide4claMmen 




President 
Ted Sermonet 
Milwaukee, Wis. 



Hum&i, GlaM OUice^i 



Vice-President 
William Bollwerk 
University City, Mo. 






Secretary-Treasurer 

Lawrence Springer 

Denver, Colorado 



Student Council Representative 
Robert Eldredge 
Denver, Colorado 



Student Council Alternate 
Richard Dines 
Denver, Colorado 








Conrad Adams 
Golden, Colorado 

Kenneth Babbitt 
Flagstaff, Ariz. 

Edward Beauvais 
Pueblo, Colo. 



Thomas Birdsall 
St. Louis, Mo. 

Robert Buckley 
Denver, Colo. 

Wilfred Brickell 

Colorado Springs, Colo. 




Michael Brophy 
Wauwatosa, Wis. 



Sid Blubaugh 
Wichita, Kans. 



/- 



(MWl 




Frank Cambria 

Brooklyn, New York 

Vincent Carbone 
Denver, Colo. 

Joseph Chase 
Thornton, Colo. 



Jack Chavez 
Denver, Colo. 

Lloyd Churchill 
Denver, Colo. 

Hank Close 
Wilmette, 111. 






V* 



■-, :;:*S- : 



FR. TEELING, PRESIDENT RYAN, AND FR. MATTIONE LOOKING OVER 
SITE OF NEW STUDENT CENTER. 





;■ 



um&i 



GlaM, 



Romauld Compton 
Denver, Colo. 



Ben Costa 

Albuquerque, N. M. 




** 



/' 




Joseph Cummings 
Denver, Colo. 

Edward Currart 
Denver, Colo. 

Thomas Davidson 
Denver, Colo. 



Anthony Deane, Jr. 
Denver, Colo. 

Michael Dollahan 
Chicago, Illinois 

Paul Doring 
Kansas City, Mo. 




Edward Gallegos 
Lajara, Colorado 



Louis Gerweck 

Cheyenne Wells, Colo. 



$> 



WW&l 




Edward Gormley 
Salt Lake City, Utah 

Chuck Graham 
Denver, Colo. 

Roger Gubbins 
Flossmoor, 111. 



Donald Hanneman 
Denver, Colo. 

James Hanson 
Denver, Colo. 

Edward Hermann 
Denver, Colo. 





William Hoban 
Denver, Colo. 



/- 



umw 



Glau 



John Jensen 
Topeka, Kans. 



Edwin Kearns 
Golden, Colo. 




mam 




Robert Kopp 
Florissant, Mo. 

James Krueger 
Emporia, Kansas 

George Lutito 
Denver, Colo. 



Joseph McNulty 
Wheatridge, Colo. 

Bill McDonough 
Chicago, 111. 

Arthur Mansfield 
Denver, Colo. 



/■ 



UM&l 



Claw, 




Robert Moore 
Denver, Colo. 



William Moss 

Oklahoma City, Okla. 




WHAT? ME! IN THE RANGER? 






Robert Moynihon 
Denver, Colo. 

John Mullone 
Denver, Colo. 

Raymond Nass 
Plymouth, 111. 



Michael O'Holleam 
Wheaton, 111. 

Sam O'Neal 
University City, Mo. 

George Park 
Tulsa, Okla. 




UM4&1 





Jimmy Raine 
Leadville, Cola 

Dick Rohrer 
Strasburg, Colo. 

Paul Rotar 
Arvada, Colo. 



Philip Ruoff 
St. Louis.. Mo. 

Dan Samide 
Denver, Colo. 

Elvinio Sandoval 
Denver, Colo. 




Irvin Sandoval 
Santa Fe, N. M. 



Anthony Santopietro 
Denver, Colo. 



; 



um<¥i 



Glau 



YOUR NEW LAB PARTNER, JONES ... HIS NAME IS JEKYL. 




7*i*0tAtt 



Robert Schenk 
Wichita, Kansas 

James Sena 
Denver, Colo, 

Mike Severino 
Denver, Colo. 



Phil Sharkey 
Toulon, 111. 

Robert Smilanic 
Englewood, Colo. 

William Stewart 
Pueblo, Colo. 




AIN'T THIS SWEET 




/ 



U4U&1 



Clou 



George Summers 
Denver, Colo. 



Charles Teague 
Wheatridge, Colo. 



Thomas Torrey 
Denver, Colo. 






1 - 



Frank Zito 
Denver, Colo. 



Howard Tritz 
Leadville, Colo. 

James Verretta 
Wheairidge, Colo. 

Joseph Villarreal 
Denver, Colo. 



Richard Vitry 
Denver, Colo. 

Joseph Weber 
Denver, Colo. 

Martin Welles 
Milwaukee, Wis. 





a ^, 






President 
Terrence Sheehy 
Garden City, Kan. 



Vice-President 
James Molchan 
Peoria, 111. 





s. 





Secretary -Treasurer 
Charles McCarthy 
Taos, N. M. 



Student Council Representative 
Kenneth Ash 

Colorado Springs, Colo. 



Student Council Alternate 
Thomas Dean 
St. Louis, Mo. 





f- , f f f 



Eugene Cavaliere Carl Cecchine 

Denver, Colo. Denver, Colo. 



LeRoy Abbott 
Delta, Colo. 

Peter Avila 
Denver, Colo. 

Robert Bettinger 
Golden, Colo. 

Ronald Bettinger 
Golden, Colo. 



V 



Henry Blum 

Fort Collins, Colo. 

Joseph Boyle 
Denver, Colo. 

Lawrence Brady 
Denver, Colo. 



Ralph Brienza 
Denver, Colo. 

James Butler 
Chicago, 111. 

Leigh Callender 
Sterling, Colo. 



£<mmmMed, 




Vincent Cerrone 
Wheatridge, Colo, 

Leo Chiolero 
Denver, Colo. 

Pete Cocozzella 
Denver, Colo. 

Joseph Coogan 
Denver, Colo. 



. 



Terry Connor 
River Forest, 111 

Donald Creager 
Pueblo, Colo. 

Joe Culig 
Pueblo, Colo. 



George Curtin 
Tulsa, Okla. 

James Danahey 
Denver, Colo. 

William DeLuzio 
Denver, Colo. 





Tom De Rochie 
Albuguergue, N. M 

Don Dierks 

Hot Springs, Ark. 



Gerald Garland 
Denver, Colo. 

Robert Goetz 
Englewood, Colo. 



Edward Elliott 
Denver, Colo. 

Michael Erhard 

Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Edward Fidel 
Santa Fe, N. M. 




Donald Dill 
Denver, Colo. 

William Dines 
Denver, Colo. 

Paul Doyle 
Denver, Colo. 

Joseph Dwyer 
Denver, Colo. 



Donald Fisher 
Denver, Colo. 

William Freeman 
Denver, Colo. 

Charles Fuermann 
Denver, Colo. 




WELL YOU DON'T HAVE TO GET SORE ABOUT IT! 




Bill Clark 
Denver, Colo. 

Daniel Frank 
Denver, Colo. 

John Gould 
Golden, Colo. 

Tom Griffin 
Albuquerque, N. M. 








Kevin Growney 
Kansas City, Mo. 

Clem Hackenthal 
Lakewood, Colo. 

Norman Haug 
Lakewood, Colo. 



Joseph Hawley 
Denver, Colo. 

John Herbert 
Denver, Colo. 

John Herrick 
Leadville, Colo. 




JOINT'S RAIDED! 






Joe Lopez 
Denver, Colo. 

Vincent Mangus 
Louisville, Colo 



TfAt&W 



Robert Lctnz 
Colo. Springs, Colo 

Bob Linnenberger 
Denver, Colo. 



Richard Kelly 
Durango, Colo. 

William Kiefer 

Grand Junction, Colo. 

Fred Kurtz 

Wheatridge, Colo. 




James Hofsetz 
Denver, Colo. 

Francis James 
Jansen, Colo. 

Dick Johnston 

Colo. Springs, Colo, 

Don Keenan 
Wichita Kansas 



John Kuhrt 
Pueblo, Colo. 

Don Longer 
Denver, Colo. 

Robert Lalich 
Denver, Colo. 




Regis Malloy 
Denver, Colo. 

George Martelon 
Denver, Colo. 

Eleuterio Martinez 
Santa Fe, N. M. 

Roger Martinez 
Derby, Colo. 



Frederick Maslanik 
Denver, Colo. 

William Meiers 

Arkansas City, Kansas 

David Moffitt 
Derby, Colorado 



Patrick Moran 
Denver, Colo. 

Paul Mulgueen 
Denver, Colo. 

Leonard Muniz 
Denver, Colo 




UNDERSTAND THAT MEAT'S PRETTY TOUGH TONIGHT! 




Mathew Nickels 
Aurora, 111. 





Louis Rotter 
St. Louis, Mo. 

Larry Scheetz 
Denver, Colo. 




Henry Pfeffle 
St. Louis, Mo. 

Tom Pepin 
Denver, Colo. 

Victor Perrella 
Denver, Colo. 



Edward Powers 
Riverside, 111. 

Ray Reddick 
Denver, Colo. 

James Rosa 
Denver, Colo. 



Gerald Noe 
Denver, Colo. 

Emmett O'Brien 
St. Louis, Mo. 

Jim O'Connor 
Denver, Colo. 

Peter Paoli 
Hollywood, Calif. 




THEY'RE REALLY PUSHING THAT COURSE THIS SEMESTER! 







QooD 





Ray Schneringer 
Denver, Colo. 

Francis Shyne 
Frankfort, Kans. 

Paul Sloan 
Denver, Colo. 

Dan Spensieri 
Lafayette, Colo. 



Andreole Stajcar 
Denver, Colo. 

Jerome Steinauer 
Denver, Colo. 

Donald Stewart 
Lakewood, Colo 



Joe Sullivan 
Douglas, Wyoming 

Joe E. Sullivan 
Denver, Colo. 

James Sutton 
Pueblo, Colo. 




IF I HAD SOME MORE MONEY I'D REALLY HANG ONE ON. 





Roger Sweeney 
Denver, Colo. 

Joseph Talarico 
Denver, Colo. 



1 1 -,. 



John Tardbino 
Trinidad, Colo. 

Herb Tornow 
Denver, Colo. 

Jack Treloar 
Denver, Colo. 

Bill Valentine 
Aurora, Colo. 



Bob Valko 
Denver.. Colo. 

Donald Vollmer 
Denver, Colo. 

Jean C. Walker, 
Colorado Springs, 
Colo. 

Mike Wanebo 
Denver, Colo. 




FR. MALECEK, MR. COYNE, BISHOP SULLIVAN IN DEAN'S OFFICE. 




President 

Frank Maggio 






^■Wj 



Vice-President 
William Schaf fer 




Secre tctry-Treas urer 
David Eby 





Student Council Representative 
John Duggan 

NOW IS THE TIME TO PREPARE FOR LIFE. 



Student Council Alternate 
Andrew Klein 





Joseph Abramo 
Montrose, Colo. 

John Alenius 
Denver, Colo. 

Orlando Alire 
Denver, Colo. 

George Allen 
Oklahoma City, Okla. 



Sante Alonzi 
Denver, Colo. 

James Arvidson 
Keokuk, Iowa 

Jack Bailey 
Denver, Colo. 

Don Baltes 
Golden, Colo. 



Richard Barnes 
Denver, Colo. 

Martin Bates 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Reggie Bart 

Longmont, Colo. 

Robert Baumgartner 
Denver, Colo. 



Jerry Beacom 

South Sioux City, Neb. 

Duane Beal 
Alliance, Nebr. 

Jim Bennett 

Sioux City, Iowa 

George Beutner 
Tomahawk, Wis. 



fyteMimen 



Kenneth Blick 
Roggen, Colo. 

James Boatright 
Denver, Colo. 

Michael Bowen 

University City, Mo. 





William Brady 
Denver, Colo. 

Dean Broun 

Pinckneyville, 111. 

Ray Bremer 

Lakewood, Colo. 

Michael Bricker 
Hamilton, 111. 



Ted Brill 
Ottawa, Kansas 

Robert Britt 
Clayton, Mo. 

William Brown 
Enid, Okla. 

Robert Bruggeman 
Selden, Kansas 



Michael Burke 
Albuquergue, N. M. 

John Carbone 
Denver, Colo. 

Louis Caricato 
Pueblo, Colo. 

John Chambers 
Denver, Colo. 



Richard Chiodini 
Denver, Colo. 

John Clarkin 
Satanta, Kans. 

John Cloutman 
Salem, Mass. 

Stephen Compton 
Denver, Colo. 




IS .it 
T 






fynedJwnen 





Robert Conklin 
Denver, Colo. 

Charles Connolly 
Sioux City, la. 

Don Cordova 
Trinidad, Colo 




Ernest Coriz 
Santa Fe, N. M. 

Benedict Cosimi 
Denver, Colo. 

George Coughlin 
Denver, Colo. 

James Creamer 
Denver, Colo. 



Gerard Cullen 
Cheyenne, Wyo. 

Barry Dawson 
Denver, Colo. 

John DeWitt 
Griswold, la. 

Terrence Dooher 
Denver, Colo. 



Ronald Domoff 
Milwaukee, Wis. 

Jim Dorsey 
Denver, Colo. 

Louis Doyle 
Pueblo, Colo. 

Bernard Duncan 
Casper, Wyo. 



George Dunn 
Denver, Colo. 

Dave Eby 
Denver, Colo. 

Rav Engelhart 
West Allis, Wis. 

John Eschweiler 
Milwaukee, Wis. 



fynedJwnen 



Robert Etzkorn 
Englewood, Colo. 

Richard Eyre 
Denver, Colo. 

John Fehringer 
Peetz, Colo. 




Michael Floyd 
Denver, Colo, 

Phil Fortune 
Denver, Colo. 

Theodore Foti 
Milwaukee, Wis. 

Thomas Freeman 
Denver, Colo. 



Alphonse Frei 
Denver, Colo. 

Ravmond Frenchmore 
Trinidad, Colo. 

Tennvson Fuller 
Valley Park, Mo. 

John Geraghiy 
Denver, Colo. 



Jess Geradi 
Trinidad, Colo. 

Carl Gerity 
Denver, Colo. 

Dennis Gillen 
Greeley, Colo. 

Michael Glass 
Wichita, Kans. 



Art Grant 
Fort Morgan, Colo. 

William Gregory 
Climax, Colo. 

Donald Hall 
Rawlins, Wyo. 

John Hartmeyer 
Muncie, Ind. 




fyne&kmen 




Jerry Haushalter 
Wauwatosa, Wis. 

Larry Hawn 
Denver, Colo. 

Alan Haynes 
Dugway, Utah 




Jack Heard 
Denver, Cola., 

Andrew Hudson 
Denver, Colo. 

Fred Hules 
Phoenix, Ariz. 

Donald Huppert 
Engelwood, Colo. 



James Huppert 
Engelwood, Colo. 

James Jaramillo 
Denver, Colo. 

John Jaramillo 
Denver, Colo. 

Danny Jiron 
Denver, Colo. 



Robert Johnson 
Golden, Colo. 

James Kearney 
Monmouth, 111. 

Michael Kerrigan 
Leadville, Colo. 

Lawrence Klein 
Denver, Colo. 



Thomas Kukar 
Chicago, 111. 

Melvyn LaBelle 
Denver, Colo. 

Michael Lane 
Leadville, Colo. 

Gerald Lawless 
Denver, Colo. 



tf-iedMmen 



Lawrence Leikes 
Englewood, Colo. 

Leo Lloyd 

Durango, Colo. 

Michael Logan 
Milwaukee, Wis. 




Hi 



Walter Lopp 

Kansas City, Mo. 

Daniel Loughman 
Hclyoke, Colo. 

Bob Luckenbach 
Denver, Colo. 

Thomas Luepke 
St. Louis, Mo. 



Richard Lupori 
Chicago, 111. 

Thomas Luttrell 
Whea+ridge, Colo. 

David McCarthy 
Grand Island, Neb. 

Robert McColm 
Santa Fe, N. M. 



James McCormick 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Bill Mangus 
Louisville, Colo. 

Mario Mapelli 
Denver, Colo. 

Harold Marcotte 
Salina, Kans. 



Joseph Marcus 
Denver, Colo. 

Joseph Markey 
Englewood, Colo. 

Larry Marguez 
Denver, Colo. 

James Maschinot 
Denver, Colo. 




fyteiluiiea 




Keith Meisel 
Rock Falls, 111. 

Robert Merz 

West Allis, Wis. 

John Middleton 
Denver, Colo. 



; 'V';'^ 




Robert Midtlying 
Idaho Falls, Idaho 

> Harry Morgan 
Lamar, Colo. 

Lloyd Morris 
Climax, Colo. 

Gene Mueller 
New Baden, 111. 



Thomas Murphy 

Oklahoma City, Okla. 

Gary Mynatt 
Oklahoma City, Okla. 

Raymond Nalty 
Denver, Colo. 

Donald Nemeth 
East Chicago, HI. 



Richard O'Grady 
Denver, Colo, 

Michael O'Meara 
Denver, Colo. 

James Obst 
Dallas, Texas 

Timothy O'Leary 
Denver, Colo. 



Bernie O'Neill 
Denver, Colo. 

Tom Parisi 
Denver, Colo. 

Charles Perko 
Loyal, Wis. 

Thomas Perruca 
Denver, Colo. 



fyti£&kmzn 



Robert Povondra 
Denver, Colo. 

Joseph Quinn 
New York, N. Y. 

Frank Quintero 
Salina, Kans. 





Emmett Romey 

Wheat Ridge. Colo. 

Arthur Ramponi 
Denver, Colo. 

John Randolf 
Hastings, Nebr. 

Terry Reynolds 
Denver, Colo. 



John Robinson 
Denver, Colo. 

Charles Romero 
Denver, Colo. 

David Rottino 

Bronx, New York 

Mark Rowe 
Sioux City, la. 



Leuben Ruibal 
Denver, Colo. 

James Sambol 
Kansas City, Mo. 

John Savard 
Denver, Colo. 

George Schieferecke 
Dresden, Kans. 



John Schippers 

Albuguerque, N. M. 

Kurt Schrang 
Milwaukee, Wis. 

Bruce Scott 

Wauwatosa, Wis. 

John Scott 
Englewood, Colo. 




fynedJwieti 




Stanley Shepard 
Denver, Colo. 

Vincent Smith 
Fcdrplay, Colo. 

David Sprehe 

Oklahoma City, Okla. 




Robert Stein 
Denver, Colo. 

Michael Stuart 
Denver, Colo. 

Jack Styers 
Denver, Colo. 

Jim Styers 
Denver, Colo. 



Walter Swirczynski 
Oklahoma City, Okla. 

Richard Switzer 
Denver, Colo. 

Frank Szynskie 
Denver, Colo. 

Thomas Tague 
Milwaukee, Wis. 



Leonard Talbow 
Denver, Colo. 

Stephen Telatnik 
Avon Lake, Ohio 

Kenneth Taylor 
Denver, Colo. 

Ernie Tenderish 
Littleton, Colo. 



Thomas Torrez 
Denver, Colo. 

Virgil Valdez 
La Jara, Colo. 

Kenneth Vendena 
Denver, Colo. 

James Vigil 
Denver, Colo. 



fynebkmen 



Lowell Volmer 
Draper, So. Dak. 

Jerome Walrond 
St. Louis, Mo. 

John Waris 
St. Joseph, Mo. 




40^^^% 




Steven Wcrthen 
Denver, Colo. 

Paul Watson 
Denver, Colo. 

John Weber 
Denver, Colo. 

Kenneth Weibel 
Denver, Colo. 



Terry Welsh 
Great Bend, Kas. 

William Whelan 
Denver, Colo. 

James Wetzel 
St. Louis, Mo. 

Raymond Wilkinson 
Cheyenne, Wyo. 



John Williams 
Denver, Colo. 

Michael Williams 
Denver, Colo. 

Mario Zarlengo 
Denver, Colo. 

William Zivic 
Denver, Colo. 



THE WOES OF COLLEGE LIFE 



Bert Zumtobel 
Denver, Colo. 










1 : " } f t 




* <i 





tf* 



.">< 







vcyj* 



y i & 



">jCA 







. GIVES RISE TO THESE DREAMS. 





ft O y cue y R ^ 








OtefGJidqtitUmb 





Student (council 1956 



The Student Council aims at strengthening relations be- 
tween the students of the various classes and organizations, 
and between the students and the administration of the col- 
lege. The Council encourages existing student activities and 
facilitates the development of new ones, strives to discover 
student talent and to foster student initiative. 



Tim 

Harrington 

President 

Maurice 
O'Connor 
Vice- 
President 

Jim 
Brown 
Secretary - 
Treasurer 



Gerald 
Schmitt 
Director 

James 

Drinkard 

Director 

Thomas 

Hoogerwerf 

Director 






Rev. John Quirk, S.J. 
Moderator 



Bill 

Bollwerk 

President 

Mike 
Severino 
Vice- 
President 

Ray 

Nass 

Secretary 




George 

Lutito 

Treasurer 

Jim 

Sena 

Director 

Sid 

Blubaugh 

Director 




REV. HARRY KLOCKER, JOHN KIRCHNER, VERY REV. RICHARD RYAN, BOB MOYNIHAN, TERRY CONNOR, CHARLES MURPHY. 



^odaliti 



SODALITY INSTITUTE MEETING 




THE SODALITY AIMS AT PROCURING THE GREATEST 
POSSIBLE HOLINESS FOR ITS MEMBERS AND AT EX- 
TENDING TO MANY OTHERS THEIR SALUTARY INFLU- 
ENCE FOR THE GOOD OF SOULS. IT MUST THEREFORE 
LABOR BY VARIOUS MEANS TO FOSTER PIETY IN THE 
SODALISTS AND LEAD THEM TO PRACTICE WORKS OF 
CHARITY TOWARDS THELR NEIGHBORS. 




Ray Engelhart, Rohn Herrick, Elvinio Sandoval, Tom Elnen, Jerry Cullen, John 
Waris, Larry Cline, Ken Blick, Gene Mueller, Leo Smith, Steve Telatnick, Mike Erhard. 



Paul Sldan, Joe Sullivan, Lou Doyle, Terry Connor, Ken A 
Kelly, Chuck Woodward, Charlie McCarthy, Lou Gerweck, 
Art Grant, Paul Erramouspe, Jim Arvidson. 






1 



V 



^3oaaliii 



WOMEN'S SODALITY RECEIVES HOLY COMMUNION. 






— 
















'&& 



lid nCnutn 



r 



\m 



anaeri 




(Standing, from left to right) Gene Mueller, Larry Klein, Cliif Dobant, John Tanner, Skip Muench, Jess Gerardi, Mr. Ericke, Director. 

(Middle row, seated from left to right) Dave McCarthy, Dick Rohrer, Art Grant, Ken Blick, Lou De Paemelere, Fred Hules. 

(Front row, seated from left to right) Lee Szynskie, Marty Hart, Beverly McCarty, Ed Kelly, Leo Smith, John Janacio, Steve Telatnik, Jim Raine. 






K^lioir O/n 



f 



en 



REHEARSING IN CHOIR LOFT OF REGIS 




f\ho C«/ »j/ 



9 



ma 



■raterni 




(Members — left to right) Fehringer, Reynolds, Hassey, Barnes, 
Nickels, Stewart. 



future ZJeach 



en o 





(Members — standing) Garbella, Kelly, Davis. 
(Seated) Stewart, Lawbaugh, Ploussard. 




(Officers — left to right) Sferra (parliamentarian), Severino (treasurer), Dick- 
erson (secretary), Mr. Van Valkenburg (moderator), Simpson (president), Mr. 
Nickolson (Prin. Lake Shore High School), Campbell (historian), Rendulich 
(vice-president). 



The purpose of the Future Teachers of America is to give students 
who have an interest in teaching an opportunity to gain knowledge 
and experience concerning the teaching profession. 



(Standing — left to right) Zivic, Gerweck, Marquez, Bischof, Merz, Batt. 
(Seated) Moore, Moss, Rosado, Falsetto. 



ft 



a otLJielia \_jamma 



a Hon a { L^atkoiU 



^J-raterniti 





Rev. Bernard Karst 
Moderator 



The purpose of this fraternity is to unite con- 
genial-minded Regis men in a brotherhood of love 
and high respect; to develop the highest Christian 
ideals of manhood among its members; to foster 
the interest of Regis College among its members 
and their fellow students; to organize and maintain 
an association composed of all Regis alumni; and 
to actively support all functions of any other or- 
ganized group at Regis insofar as the function is 
undertaken for the benefit of the school. 



Officers: Harold V/anebo, Leo Cremins, Dan Riordan, Jack Plumb. 





Back: Martin Welles, Maurice O'Connor, John Herbert, Mike Wanebo. 

Middle: Charles McCarthy, Terry Sheehy, James Creamer. 

Front: Paul Foley, Dick Dines, Ron Hermes, Phil Sharkey, Bob Valko. 




(Above) — leit to right — Graham, Shannon, Lawbaugh, Schmidt, Riordan. (Middle) — Jones, Wanebo, Gersbach, Deline, Quad- 
racci. (Bottom) — Dunn, Staley, Cremins. 



lortman 



u 




Members — Rear — Lane, Chauvin, Lamansky. 
Center — Elnen, Franz, Springer. 
Front — Gould, Ashcroft, Gilbert. 
Holding gun at right — Rohrer. 



R CU 



As always, the Athletic organization on the Regis College 
campus is an important club. "R" Club members have dis- 
tinguished themselves in one or a number of athletic activities: 




tennis, baseball, golf, basketball, and skiing. Their clean 
sportsmanship in all phases of athletic life endeavors to elevate 
Regis to greater dignity and glory. 




Rear — Sermonet Nass, Pingpank. 
Front — Dunn, Staley, Harrington. 



Rear — Beauvais, Butler, Hower, Gatens. 
Front — Collins, Caron. 




•3/. Aokn 
vJ>ercnmanA -^3o 




t 




Rear — Obst, Grant, Merz, Engelhart. 
Center — Clarkin, Haynes, Hall, Gahl. 
Front — Brown, Wilkinson, Gerardi, Loughman. 



One of the largest organizations on the Regis campus, 
the St. John Berchmans Society provides servers for the many- 
Masses each day. Besides these regular Masses, the Society 
has men serving at Benediction, Stations of the Cross, and 
special Masses whenever needed. Under the direction of the 
Rev. Thomas F. Singleton S.J., the Society's objective is that 
no Mass be said on the campus without having an acolyte 
present to assist the priest. It gives the student members a 
chance to better assist at all religious exercises. The integrity 
of the Society is shown by its large membership. 




Rear — Molchan, Griffin, Kiefer, Pfeffle, McCarthy. 
Center — T. Murphy, Sutton, Kelly, Sullivan, Bergkamp. 
Front — Muench, Beutner, Mendez, Regan, Dierks. 




>1^%- |T? 



Rear — Arvidson, Marcotte, Britt, McCarthy. 
Center — Braun, Hules, DeWitt, Beal. 
Front — Kerrigan, Klein, Batt, Gillen. 



Rear — Hellman, Babbitt, Sweeney. 
Center — O'Connor, Raine, Rosado. 
Front — Erramouspe, Brophy, Kelly. 



' k a ^J\app a /- 5 1 




The objects of Alpha Kappa Psi are these: to further the 
individual welfare of its members, to foster scientific research 
in the fields of commerce, accounts, and finance; to educate 
the public to appreciate and demand higher ideals therein; 
and to promote and advance in institutions of college rank, 
courses leading to degrees in business administration. 



Former oificers and moderator — left to right — Foley, Kelly, Jagger, Mr. Wagner 
(mod.), DePamelere, Hellman. 





New officers and moderator — Rear, left to right — Rotter, Lutito, Mr. Dwyer 
(mod.). Front, left to right — Clark, Raine, Connor. 



Back, left to right — Lutito, Hawley, Rohrer, Creager, Scott. Front — Connor, 
Clark, Fidel, Lamansky, Raine. 




Rear, left to right — Babbitt, Engelhart, Hellman, Sweeney, Lutito, Brown. Front, left 
to right — Chase, Kelly, O'Rourke, Pepin, Clark, Scott, Sanders, Erramouspe. 



Left to right — Sutton, DeRochie, Beutner, Martinez, Whelan, Gallegos, Blick, Mendez, 
O'Rourke, Dawson, Butler, Jiron, Arvidson, Compton, Rotter, Mapelli, Dwyer, Parella, 
Wetzel. 




Illllll 



Hear — Sweeney, Beauvais, Zook, Sanders, Iten. 

Front — Hart, Ashcroft, Cushner, John Culig, Chauvin. 





GOVERNOR McNICHOLS, A FORMER REGIS GRADUATE, PRESENTS ALPHA 
KAPPA PSI'S MAN OF THE YEAR AWARD TO MR. VINCENT DWYER, MANAG- 
ING EDITOR OF THE ROCKY MOUNTAIN NEWS. 



Jagger, Hellman, Kelly, and Foley. 




John Culig, Joe Culig, Birdsall, Caricato, Murphy, Rohrer, Quinn, Springer, Griffin, 
Marky, Mueller, Doring, Goetz, Creager, Fidel, Brady, Regan, Meiers. 



First Semester Pledge Class — Rear — Hofschetz, Griffin, Butler, Quinn, Babbitt. Middle 
— Markey, E. J. Martinez, O'Rourke, Doring, Pepin, Pereella. Front — Beutner, M. Mar- 
tinez, Gallegos, Meidl, Regan. 



/ 



i5 x^olieqe 



aato 



Elation 




n&*. ■&& 



****%. 




>■■/ 

Moderator Mr. Klene 




DEAN CUES DAVIDSON AND BLUBAUGH 



Bringing the student of Regis College news, music, and 
sports from the campus, Denver, and nation. One of the newer 
organizations on campus, presenting programs daily. 



//// 5 5ouri Club 





FOLEY AND BALDWIN IN CONTROL ROOM CUE BRITT AT MIKE. SMITH AND DAUES 
STAND WHILE DEAN MEDITATES. 




Standing — Klein, Fuller, Britt, Bowen, Daues, Maher, Lopp, Burdeau, Wetzel, Walrond. 
Seated — Buckley, Waris, Leupke. 



FLYING TO MISSOURI 




«3&* i^iuo 




Fr. Fred Daly, S.J. 
Moderator 



ALL SET FOR A BIG DAY ON THE SNOW-COVERED SLOPES 







Among the more active groups on campus, the boys with 
the slats have complemented the school with their antics on 
the slopes. Weekend trips to Arapahoe Basin, Winter Park, 
Berthoud Pass, and Aspen are always in order after a long 
week in the classrooms. Joint trips with Loretto to the moun- 
tains find all the ski areas cluttered with "snow bunnies," 
"trail-apes," and "schussboomers" of all manner and descrip- 
tion. All you need is the determination, the boards, and a pair 
of strong underpinnings to become one of the arrived. 



WICK, WANEBO, AND GORMLEY PAUSE FOR A REST 




SOOOO EASY 




JOE DUNN AND BETSY GILL 




SHEPARD, LUPORL OBST, AND SCHRAN 




Ok. 8, 



rown 



COLUMNISTS MOORHEAD AND SENA 



College news, feature articles, and 
campus chatter are conveyed to the 
student body via the official student 
periodical publication, the Brown and 
Gold. Regis College's newspaper is 
published bi-weekly by a complete 
staff of students who volunteer their 
services to contribute good journalism 
and sound Catholic thought. The 
publication is widely distributed 
throughout the nation to alumni, former 
faculty members, and other college 
newspapers. 



Staff — Rear — Pleffle, Telatnik, O'Rourke, Obst, Welsh. Second from top — Bollwerk, Lalich, Lawbaugh, Nass, Graham. 
Hermes, Maggio. Second from bottom — Sena, Henry, Samide, Fr. Collins, Staley, Park, Kopp. Bottom — Close, O'Con- 
nor, Foti, Sprehe. 



and k-jo id 




Standing — Graham, Creamer, Gerweck. 
Seated — Rear — Kopp, Foti, Sprehe, O'Connor. 
On edge of desk — Bollwerk. 







<SffiHHBM| 


Hi 1 




f| \ '-**$*# JP 




■■■* 1 




New co-editors Close and Sloan 




* Y" ■;.;-■ ■■■■ 



CREAMER TALKS WITH SAMBOL AND CAMBRIA 




NASS AND PARK SELECTING TYPE 




WELSH, HERMES, AND SHARKEY 




Advertising: Terry Welch 
Co-Editors 




Business Manager: Harry Quadracci 




Co-Editors, Jack Treloar and Eugene O'Neal talking to Ray Nass. 




^ 



I 



m 



\ , 



r\an 



U 




STAFF MEMBERS AT ANNUAL RANGER BANQUET 



k 






u .. 




ler 





Photographer: Jim Sambol 



Terry Welch, Jim O'Connor, Harry Quadracci, and Bob Britt. 



~^tl 



uinai 



^rfcadi 



enti 



The initiation of what could develop into a regional- 
ly famous organization, the Aguinas Academy, is devoted 
to discussing the philosophies of St. Thomas and antag- 
onistic philosophies. Moderated by the eloguent Harry 



R. Klocker, S.J., the Academy is composed of members 
from Regis, Loretto Heights, the Air Force Academy, and 
Denver University. 



These pictures are of activities of the 
club. The activities were climaxed by 
an informal debate featuring Prof. 
Julius Schultz, professor of philosophy 
at Ft. Lewis, A&M., and an exponent of 
Existentialism. His opponent was Rev. 
Henry Klocker, S.J., whose penetrating 
mind has won him national acclaim as 
an authority on Thomistic philosophy. 
The following pictures were taken at 
the debate. 




FR. KLOCKER BRINGS OUT A POINT IN DEBATE. 



PROFESSOR SCHULTZ COUNTERS A THRUST. 



SMITHISLER ABSORBS FR. KLOCKER. 





U ircle ~J\ *yn tern a ito mat 



PAST OFFICERS 



PRESENT OFFICERS 



President: ROBERT H. CHAUVIN 
Vice-President: JOHN A. PLUMB 
Treasurer: JAMES N. CUSHNER 
Secretary: CHARLES K. GERSBACH 



President: REGIS P. MALLOY 
Vice-President: ARNO J. MUENCH 
Treasurer: TERRENCE V. CONNOR 
Secretary: WARREN C. HARTENBACH 




Circle K International is the college 
branch of the Kiwanis International and 
is an organization devoted to providing 
an opportunity for leadership training 
in service and developing aggressive 
citizenship and the spirit of service in 
its members. The branch of the organ- 
ization at Regis, which was established 
on this campus in 1956, is the first such 
club on the campus of any Catholic 
college or university in the United 
States. 



Charter Members — Rear — George Lutito, Jack Plumb, Dick Rohrer, Ernie (sponsor), Ed Heiman. Front — Gene Lamansky, 
Ed Fidel, Al Jackson, Ed Sena, Bob Chauvin. 



Mr. Martin Kelly speaks at meeting. 



New Members — Larson, Fidel, Hartenbach, Mr. Baier, Rohrer, Lamansky, Heiman, Sprehe, 
Creager, Muench, Malloy, Connor. 





aiian 



CL 




OFFICERS: SFERRA, SEVERINO, CERRONE, DELUZIO 



MEMBERS OF ITALIAN CLUB 














t-.tr. 



~gw;.£ 




. 






Zruture f\eqi& 





/Jctiuitiel 





THEY'RE OFF 



** %,, '<** 




THIS IS INITIATION? 




GO MAN. GO!!! 



Zrreilt 



man 




BOARD OF DIRECTORS 




CAMPUS IMPROVEMENTS 




BIG BROTHER IS WATCHING!!! 



+9 nit i a 



li 



ion 




DO YOU PLAY BASKETBALL? 




GOOD GRIEF!!!! 




«^5JSS 






.?'* 



THEY KEEP MOVING ALONG 




WE WERE STROLLING ALONG 




TO ACQUAINT THE FRESHMEN 




THE REWARD 



ZJo ^rtcauaint the 
(JSenefiti of 



COMMUNITY 
BATH 




BtfiMmaita 




BLESS HIS HEART!! 




CAMPUS CLEAN-UP CREW 



^J-re&n 



men wi 



tk tL 




IKeyis cJLife 



FIRST DP'S ARRIVE 







JUST PART OF THE 
FUN, SAM!! 




. 



1 1 




FR. McSHANE LEADS MEDITATION BEFORE EXERCISE 




PAPAL BLESSING AT END OF EXERCISES 



ILLUSTRATING A POINT 




Keaii r\etreat 



9 



The Regis retreat was this year split into two sections. 
Fr. James L. McShane gave the retreat for seniors in the col- 
lege library. Fr. Eugene Latta, S.J., gave the retreat for under- 
classmen in the college chapel. 



Zke Presentation 
of 1956 
Presented 

Mpha Kappa 
fraternity 





QUEEN CANDIDATES— CAROL SHEEHAN, MARILYN DUNN, MARILYN VAN DERBER, MARIANNE RICKS, LUCILLE ADDUCCI 




Marilyn VanDerbur 

Sponsored by 

Ski Club 
Escorted by 
Sam O'Neal 



2 



ueea 



Mary Anne Dunn 

Sponsored by 

Denver Club 

Escorted by 

Lou Pozelnik 




Marianne Ricks 

Sponsored by 

ADG 

Escorted by 

Ted Sermonet 



Gandidate^ 





Carol Sheehan 

Sponsored by 

AKPsi 
Escorted by 
Jim Jagger 



*1£m Cotom&tkm Ball 

4 

1956 

Presented by 
Alpha Delta Camsna 

Fraternity 

1956 

Queen of Regis 

Lucille Addueei 

Sponsored by 

. Vets-Italian Clubs 

Escorted by 

Mike Severino 





MARY KAY RATER CROWNS QUEEN LUCILLE ADDUCCI 




THE QUEEN AND HER COURT 




QUEEN ADDUCCI AND ESCORT MIKE SEVERINO 




"MISS" FLANAGAN ESCORTED 
BY "MR." PURCELL 



Qomjmtum Ball 




NANNETTE STEELE BERATES COSTA 




■'■■■ 



'. . . AND IF HE DOES RETURN 




". . . STOP IT, HE'S TAKEN ENOUGH ALREADY 





CURTAIN CALL 



". . . DON'T PUSH ME, BABY . . ." 

^Jne K^ountru Ljiri 

CAST OF CHARACTERS 

Bernie Dodd BEN COSTA 

Phil Cook BERNIE O'NEILL 

Paul Unger CHARLES GERSBACH 

Larry CLEM HACKTHAL 

Nancy Stoddard KATHLEEN CULBERTSON 

Frank Elgin FRANK SFERRA 

Georgie Elgin NANNETTE STEELE 

William Bailey ROBERT LALICH 

Ralph JAMES BENNETT 

Production staged and directed by 
Rev. A. J. Deeman, S.J. 

Settings designed and executed by 
Mario Zarlengo 

Lighting by James G. Kenna of the 
Denver Civic Theatre Staff 




'. . . ALL RIGHT, LET'S TAKE IT EASY." 




THE STRAIN WAS TOO MUCH 

^Jwelve s^rnaru rrfen 

CAST OF CHARACTERS 

Foreman BOB LALICH 

Juror Two JACK DEWITT 

Juror Three FRANK WOERTMAN 

Juror Four BEN COSTA 

Juror Five JIM SENA 

Juror Six JIM BENNETT 

Juror Seven BLAIR FARRELL 

Juror Eight BOB SUTTON 

Juror Nine LLOYD MORRIS 

Juror Ten WALTER SCOTT 

Juror Eleven LARRY MARCUS 

Juror Twelve DON HALL 

Production Staged and Directed by- 
Rev. A. J. Deeman, S.J. 




NOW WAIT A MINUTE 




"A NICE SPORTS JACKET, FATHER?' 




^Jh e ^rn nual 



Wa 



f 




"A SUIT OF CLOTHES AT A 
QUARTER A CHANCE!" 




LOSING ALL THEIR MONEY. 



f\eal3 dSaza 



9 



a.r 



1957 




BINGO!!!! 




"THEY'RE FIVE FOR A DOLLAR." 




TWO POINTS FOR A FUTURE RANGER! 




WATER-LOGGED DUCKS 



W/ap 6 




MIKE SEVERINO AND REGIS QUEEN, LUCILLE ADDUCCI 



Senior f-^i 

CM 

1957 



rom 





BAMBOO HUT 



PROM ROYALTY, MARY KAY RATER AND DAN RIORDAN 


















ALU 










Sp&dd, 



Although athletics are subordinate to the mental and moral development 
of the student, Regis College nevertheless does not overlook the relative im- 
portance and value of an active sports program. The members of the athletic 
board constantly strive to complete and to expand the sports program of the 
college. To this end both an intramural and intercollegiate athletic program 
are supported. 

Under ihe able direction of the board, organized intramural programs are 
conducted in touch football, softball, basketball, golf, tennis, volleyball, and 
ping-pong. On the intercollegiate level Regis offers basketball and baseball 
as major sports; tennis, golf and skiing as minor sports. This well-rounded 
program, offered through the efforts of the athletic board, allows every stu- 
dent opportunities for physical development. 




John Flanagan 
Athletic Director 



John Coyne 
NAIA Representative 




Fr. Fred Daly 
Intramurals 



Fr. Harry Klocker 
Board Member 





The 



Coach 




HARVEY MOORE 
Head Coach 



In his fourth year as cage mentor of the Regis Rangers, 
Harvey Moore was faced with the toughest schedule ever to 
confront a Regis College sguad. Before the season Harvey 
looked at the schedule and could but wonder as to the out- 
come. He saw names like Dayton, Niagara, Seattle, Cincinnati, 
Portland, St. Michael's, and Gustavus Adolphus. 

When the season had run its course Harvey, looking back, 
could say that they came, they saw and they conguered their 
share of the "big names." The fact that Regis did not always 
come out on the long end of the score is not the point, nor 
does it matter too much. 

What matters is that Regis is playing bigger name op- 



ponents. And the calibre of the play of the Rangers has 
improved with the calibre of the opposition. There were mis- 
takes by the team and by the coach, but this is only natural 
as they too are human. 

With the loss of three seniors, Harv is faced with the task 
of finding three replacements before he begins the next cam- 
paign. However, he still has the nucleus of a fine squad, and 
with bigger and better opposition the basketball fortunes of 
Regis are looking up. 

This year Harvey also took over the reigns of the baseball 
team. Under his guidance the Regis Diamond Aces finished 
with a winning season. 




ALL-AMERICAN BOONE INTRODUCED AS A RANGER 



UP, UP AND AWAY 
TOM HOOGERWERF 




Tom Hoogerwerf, rugged Ranger co-captain, brings his 
famous jump-shot into action in opening game against Col- 
orado School of Mines. Tom climaxed his college career with 
a burst of glory which saw his collegiate points-scored total 
soar to over 2,000 points. A great floor general, Tom was one 
of the big factors that acted as a steadying influence upon the 
young Rangers. 



KING OF THE PUSH-UP SET 
TERRY SHEEHY 



On the Crest of the 



" . . . COME TO PAPA . . 
TONY RENDXJLICH 





Terry Sheehy, sophomore center, trips in ac- 
tion against Gonzaga. Big Terry, hampered by 
a trick left knee, was limited in scope this year. 
However, when he was able to play, he gave a 
very good account of himself and gave some 
very good performances which were indicative of 
his great natural talents. If his knee does not 
give him any trouble next year, Regis fans can 
bolster their hopes. 



Tony Rendulich, senior forward, lunges for a 
loose ball in the Gonzaga game. His senior year 
capped a long and productive basketball career. 
His services were lost at the end of the year 
because of a broken ankle. Up to that time, he 
had improved his mastery of the Moore style of 
basketball skills. 



THE THREE MINUTE MILE 
BILL BOLLWERK 




Bill Bollwerk, hustling junior guard, races after 
a loose ball in the Seattle game. This game 
against Seattle was a good chance for Bill to 
give Coach Moore a true picture of the scrappy 
and aggressive Bollwerk brand of ability, fight, 
and just plain guts. If he continues to improve 
as he has done so far, Coach Moore will have 
no choice but to use Bill regularly. 





Jim Butler, classy sophomore center, racks up 
two points for the Rangers against Colorado A. & 
M. Jim started off the season in great style, but 
was attacked by a serious virus infection during 
the Christmas holidays. Because of this, his efforts 
were hampered for most of the remaining season. 
Tov/ard the end of the year, he began to shake off 
the effects of the sickness and fans began to see 
the Jim Butler that should be seen in action. Bar- 
ring a recurrence of the virus, "Butts" should be 
a big factor in the Ranger fortunes for the next 
two years. 



. . GET UP THERE . . 
BOB LINNENBERGER 



Eob Linnenberger, a rugged center-forward al- 
ternate, strains to gain altitude against Gustavus 
Adolphus. Big Bob, a transfer from Oklahoma U., 
proved to be a big shovel in the Ranger back- 
board scooping crew. In addition to being a great 
help on the boards, Bob is a tremendous hustler, 
and a good scorer when the chips are down. 
Moore's Men should really feel his presence as 
long as Bob continues to put in his big guns for 
Regis. 



BOONE FIRES FROM NO MAN'S LAND INTO THE NET 






MEAN LOOKIN', AIN'T HE? 
DICK ECKHARD 



TOWER OF POWER 
ALAN HOWER 



Dick "Spider" Eckhard breaks away during a 
game to add two more points to the Brown and 
Gold tide. Dick's real value doesn't exist on the 
scoreboard; rather, his great feature is his guts, 
fight, team spirit, and great personality, both on 
field and off. He is a tremendous player on de- 
fense and sticks to opponents in the same manner. 
Although he stands but 6-1, he is able to out jump 
almost anyone that should happen to be under- 
neath the boards at the same time. A great hand 
is in order for a great guy. 



Alan the Horse leaps high into the air to stamp 
his name among the Regis greats. This year, the 
big senior finished off his last year for the Rang- 
ers by making over 2000 in his four years at 
Regis. Alan is the co-captain of the Rangers and 
was the logical choice for the post. His talents 
can be summed up only in the annals of Ranger 
history. He is a deadly shot from close under 
or in the field. He has no peer as a backboard 
demon. He has tremendous drive, team spirit, 
influence over the team. In short, he can't be 
beat. 



BUBBLE, BUBBLE, TOIL AND TROUBLE 





THE DIXIE CANNONBALL 
JOHN GATENS 

John holds the distinction of having a jump- 
shot that could be compared to Dennis Boone's. 
That is only one of his many talents. He is what 
might be called a "Jekyll and Hyde" type of 
game. When he is off the court, he is quiet and 
almost shy; but when he is on the hardwoods, 
he is a real "holler guy." Even though he is a 
small man as basketball players go, he more than 
makes up for it in determination, drive, spirit, and 
all-around playing ability. 



MODERN DANCE CLASS HERE INTERPRETS 
"FACE ON THE BARROOM FLOOR." 




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UP AND OVER 
TED SERMONET 

Ted is another one of the well-liked imports 
from the city on Lake Michigan. "Sermo" fits 
well into the Moore brand of basketball which 
demands skill, speed, independent thought, and 
full utilization of one's talents. Big Serm was 
crippled during several of the games on the 
eastern road trip. Therefore, Coach Moore was 
not able to use him as a bulwark in the same 
manner as a drowning man seeks a chip of wood. 
Next year, Harvey Moore will be able to use 
Sermo more often if injuries do not hamper the 
big center. 




DENNIS BOONE — ALL AMERICAN 

Ranger hopes took a sudden turn for the better this year 
with the coming of the much-publicized Dennis Boone, late 
of Manual High School. 

The entire student body had heard that Boone was good. 
The question that remained on everyone's lips was, "Just how 
good?" In his first game against Colorado School of Mines, 
Boone played a fairly good game and he netted 10 points 
for the Rangers. Things continued along for Boone and he 
averaged about 12 points a game until the game against New 
Mexico. On that memorable date of December 10, Boone ex- 
ploded for 24 points against the Lobos. 

After this, it was just a question of how many points 
would Boone score in his games. He scored so many that he 
broke the following records: Most field goals in a season — 
Boone 211, Highest average for a season — Boone 21.7, Most 
points in a season — Boone 522. 

His all-round excellence as a basketball player won him 
berths on various teams of all-Americans throughout the na- 
tion. To name a few, we cite the following: Look Magazine — 
District 6, Associated Press — 3rd team small college Ail-Amer- 
ican, 3rd team Jesuit All-School; almost all opponent's first 
team against whom they played. 

It has been a rather foolhardy practice to predict the 
basketball futures of current Regis basketball teams during 
the past three or four years. Nevertheless, with Boone and a 
crop of good juniors and seniors, Regis should play at least 
as well as, if not better than, they did during the preceding 
season. Let us just hope that the schedule (if we may call a 
seemingly impossible group of games by that title) will not 
swamp the ship of Moore's men in the oncoming year. 





THE RESPONSE 



Cheerleaders 



Pear — Ed Fidel, Tom Dean, Unemployed Cambria, John Duqan, Sid Blubaugh. 
Front — Marie Sena, Sheila Murphy, Barbara Fitzpatrick, Judy Buchanan. 





TWO ON ONE— FOR TWO 




SPIRIT DRIVES HIM ON 



"dangers (tally to Calls by fans" 



CHEERS BRING RESPONSE BY TEAM 





HOOGERWERF PLAGUES MINERS WITH HIGH-FLYING JUMP 



fiegis 83— mines 68, Regis 72— Pepperdine 69, Loyola of L.fl. 82~Regis 69 



TOUGH DAY'S WORK 



RANGER AT WORK 





The Rangers started off the season in good fashion against 
a determined guintet from Mines. But the Rangers just had 
too much depth for the Miners. Tom Hoogerwerf, Ranger co- 
captain, paced Harvey Moore's men with 25 points. Jim Butler, 
sophomore center, was the surprise of the evening with his 15 
points and his fine work on the boards. 

In the first game of their western road trip, the Rangers 
were able to come back from a first half deficit to nip the boys 
from Pepperdine College by a score of 72-69. 

The next night, December 8, saw Regis stopped by a tough 
team from Loyola of Los Angeles. The Rangers just couldn't 
keep up the torrid shooting by Loyola. Bob Linnenberger was 
the Ranger ace for the night with his excellent board play. 

On the way back from the coast, the Rangers stopped off 
in Durango December 10 to battle the New Mexico Lobos. 
Dennis Boone came into his own with a 24 point performance 
which helped the Rangers to victory, 79-75. 

Monday, December 13 saw the Rangers beat Western 
State at the D. U. fieldhouse by a score of 81-77. 

The following night the Rangers hosted Western State in 
the Regis gym. The Rangers, as a team, were fantastic from 
the field and connected on 41% of their shots. Bob Linnen- 
berger was the big gun for Regis with 22 points. The score — 
Regis 101— Western State 79. 




PEGASUS 



Regis 79- new Ulexico 75, Regis 77--Colorado M 65, Regis 81 -Western State 77. 

Regis 101— Western State 79 



LINNENBERGER AND BUTLER FOLLOW-UP SHOT 



SERMO HOOKS FOR TWO 






On January 5, the Rangers returned to action in rusty 
condition. Their opponents for the hassle were the Gonzaga 
men from Spokane. The game can be put down as something 
that just isn't spoken about. To put it briefly, the Rangers lost 
a 20 point lead in the last 10 minutes of play. Their downfall 
rested in the fact that they couldn't hit more than 1 field goal 
in nine minutes during the second half. Moore's men ended 
up at the short end of a 73-69 tilt. 

Five days later the Rangers visited Alamosa to play 
Adams State. Hower scored 23 points as the Rangers avenged 
their Gonzaga defeat by tearing into their opposition and 
handing them a defeat by the score of 98-65. 

January 13th must go down as a date when Ranger fans 
could point with pride to the whole Ranger team. Tiny Regis 
handed Seattle, ranked as the number nine team in the coun- 
try, the worst scare that the Huskies had received all year. 
Regis rallied in the second half and almost overtook Seattle. 
But they just couldn't do it. Boone was top for the Rangers with 
23 points. Bollwerk and Sheehy must also get their kudos 
for fine performances to say the very least. 

The next night was St. Michael of Vermont's turn to face 
the Rangers. Boone put in a fabulous performance of 39 points 
and sent the Regions on to win 85-73. 

Adams State was the next school to fall victim to the 
Rangers. They were followed by Gustavus Adolphus. The 
Rangers won by scores of 84-56 and 110-65 respectively. 



ANYONE FOR CROQUET? 



Gonzaga 73— Regis 68, fiegis 98-fldams State 65, Seattle University 75— Regis 70 



MAN ON THE MOVE, BOB LINNENBERGER 



LINNENBERGER IN TROUBLE, PASSES TO BOONE 






GUSTAVUS ADOLPHUS SPOTS A QUARTER; SPIDER SPOTS IT TOO 

Regis 85— St. Ulichael's of Vt. 73, Regis 84-fldams State 56, 

Regis 1 1 0--Gustavus fldolphus 05 



DANGER AHEAD FOR UNNENBERGER 



HOOGERWERF LETS ONE LOOSE AGAINST ST. MICHAEL 







HOOGS SHOOTS; AGGIES CLOSE IN 



A GOOD SHOT OF BOONE'S FABULOUS ACTION 



Portland 78--fiegis 76, flegis 93--Portland 79, Cincinnati 96--Regis 81, Hiagara 92--Regis 70 



SERMONET VERSUS ST. MICHAEL 




February 1 marked the invasion of the Portland Pilots. The 
Pilots, highly ranked on the Pacific coast, were picked to slaughter 
the Rangers. But the so-called "experts" were in for an unpleasant 
joust. In the first game of the two-game Portland-Regis series, the 
Rangers, sparked by 37 points by the fabulous Boone, fought back 
from an eleven point deficit to close the gap fast. But the Rangers 
were too late and the final gun rang down the curtain on a heart- 
breaker score of 76-78. 

The next day the Rangers took the floor with confidence. That 
confidence was justified in the opening moments of the contest. 
All of the five starters of Regis made at least 10 points. Boone again 
led with 31. 

Several days later, the Rangers left on a seemingly impossible 
road-trip in the east. On the night of February 9 they faced the 
great team of Cincinnati. The Rangers got off to a good start and 
led for the first 30 minutes of play. But Cincinnati just couldn't be 
held back. The rough plane ride in which the Rangers had to land 
outside Cincinnati just seemed to overtake them at once. Cincin- 
nati surged into the lead and the Rangers never caught them after 
that. Despite Boone's 34 points, the Rangers lost by a score of 81-96. 

Two nights later the Rangers played Niagara. They were 
sparked by Boone's 29 points and Jim Butler's terrific rebounding 
against much taller opposition. But, Niagara's guns were bigger 
and the Rangers bowed in defeat, 70-92. 

Two nights later the Rangers were led by Rendulich's 24 points 
to beat the cadets of West Point. That was their only winning game 





TALL TROUBLE 



NARROW ESCAPE 



Regis 73— flrmy 70, Dayton 97— fiegis 53, Washington 0. 58— Regis 55 



HEAVY TRAFFIC 



on the ill-fated road trip. Against Army the Rangers looked like 
the Rangers of old. But, toward the end of the game, exhaustion 
began to dog the heels of Moore's men. Their steps began to falter 
and their timing was off, to name a few things. But, aided by two 
timely field goals by Boone, the Rangers were able to pull the game 
out of the fire. Rendulich put in the finest performance of his col- 
lege career as he scored 24 points and played like a dervish on 
the backboards as he snared almost all of the rebounds that came 
his way. 

The next night saw the battered Rangers completely sapped 
of their strength. They were completely worn out as they fell easy 
victims to a strong team from Dayton. The Rangers simply had 
played too much in too short a time. They were only able to put 
up token resistance as even the incomparable Boone was able to 
lead the team with only 17 points, a poor performance for him. 

Two nights later, the Rangers had yet another barrier to hurdle. 
They were the visitors to St. Louis where they played a fresh five 
from Washington U. Washington U. was really "up" for the game 
since it was the last home game for the Bears, as they are called. 
The Rangers were able to get an early lead; but in the second half, 
they were again overtaken by their old enemy, exhaustion. Wash- 
ington leaped ahead with some fabulous shooting. The Regions 
pulled up again, but their flagging bodies had taken too much and 
they lost another heartbreaker by a score of 55-58. 





Regis 75— Colorado mines 72, Texas Southern 80-Regis II 

fiegis 61-flir force Academy 45 



The Rangers came back from their disastrous road trip to 
play the gentlemen from Colorado School of Mines. However, 
on this game day of Washington's birthday, the Rangers were 
left without the second half of the Boone-Gatens backcourt com- 
bination. John Gatens was not permitted to suit up for the game 
because of the fact that he was campused. The Rangers felt the 
loss sorely. But Boone again came to the rescue and scored 26 
points for the Regis five. This, along with the Ranger good play- 
ing helped Moore's men to beat the Miners 75-72. 

Two nights later, the All-Negro team from Texas Southern 
invaded the Ranger camp. The visitors proved to be just too 
tall for the beleaguered Rangers and thus Regis fell before the 
team that had been, for the last two years, the National Negro 
Collegiate championship team. Boone put in a 21 point game 
for the Rangers, but Regis went down in defeat by a score of 
80-71. 

On March 2, the Regis forces met the highly touted Falcons 
from the Air Force Academy. This was a game that would bring 
together two teams in Denver's so-called "dream game." How- 
ever, the Regions this time had to play without their main of- 
fensive weapon, Dennis Boone. During the road trip to the east, 
he had severely wrenched his knee and was thereby lost to the 
Rangers for at least the game against the Air Force. As things 
turned out, the Rangers were able to get along without Boone 




THE SOFT TOUCH OF 
LINNENBERGER 



TONY RENDULICH 



TOM HOOGERWERF 



ALL-AMERICANS ALMOST COLLIDE 




Regis 88— Ulartburg 82, San Diego State 81 -Regis 78 




FROSH VS. VARSITY 



DENNIS BOONE 



as they rose to meet the challenge. In a game that was marred 
by much fouling and much booing, the Rangers had to slow 
down their blitzkreig style of play and change to a slow group 
of patterns. The Rangers had no trouble beating the Falcons. 
Linnenberger was top man for the Regions with 16 points. John 
Gatens distinguished himself with his defense and his slick pass- 
ing. The final score found the Rangers on top, 61-45. 

In the first round of the NCAA small college playoffs, the 
Rangers passed the test by beating Wartburg College of Iowa. 
Boone got 24 points and Hower added 21 to the total as the 
Rangers squeezed past the Warts by a score of 88-82. 

In the second round, the Rangers were not up to snuff and 
blew a 15 point lead in the second half. San Diego State tied 
the score with 39 seconds remaining to play. At this point, the 
Rangers called a highly disputed 6th time out. As a result, San 
Diego went on to win 81-78. 

So ended the Ranger season of 1956-57. The season was 
not without its share of joy tempered by a share of woe. 



Regis College Basketball Statistics Summary 



FIELD GOALS 

NAME GAMES ATTS. SCORED PCT. 

Boone, Dennis 24 532 211 39.6 

Gcrtens, John 24 296 100 33.8 

Hower, Alan 25 193 95 49.2 

Linnenberger, Bob 25 201 82 40.7 

Hoogerwerf, Tom .25 199 68 34.1 

Butler, Jim 17 109 44 40.3 

Sermonet, Ted 17 90 28 31.1 

Rendulich, Tony 23 109 42 38.5 

Eckhard, Dick .....17 44 12 27.2 

Sheehy, Terry 18 35 15 42.8 

Bollwerk, Bill 18 62 14 22.5 

REGIS TOTALS 25 1870 711 38.0 

OPPONENT TOTALS 25 1846 686 37.1 



FREE THROWS 
ATT. SCORED PCT. 



REBOUNDS PERS. POINTS 

NO. AVE. FOULS NO. AVE. 



144 


100 


69.4 


125 


5.2 


52 


522 


21.7 


100 


69 


69.0 


75 


3.1 


60 


269 


11.2 


125 


71 


56.8 


220 


8.8 


52 


261 


10.5 


127 


92 


72.4 


275 


11.0 


71 


259 


10.2 


73 


53 


72.6 


46 


1.8 


46 


189 


7.5 


48 


32 


66.6 


122 


7.1 


36 


120 


7.0 


59 


45 


76.6 


90 


5.3 


32 


101 


5.9 


se 


31 


55.3 


150 


6.5 


44 


115 


5.0 


27 


19 


70.4 


39 


2.4 


24 


43 


2.5 


22 


11 


50.0 


74 


4.1 


32 


41 


2.3 


12 


7 


58.3 


30 


1.6 


14 


35 


1.9 


793 


530 


66.8 


1246 


49.8 


463 


1947 


78.1 


747 


478 


63.9 


1245 


49.8 


470 


1850 


74.0 



Total points scored 
Field goals scored 
Free throws scored 
No. of rebounds 



CURRENT SEASON'S SINGLE-GAME RECORDS 
INDIVIDUAL HIGHS (OWN PLAYERS) 

Dennis Boone vs. St. Michaels of Vt. 
Dennis Boone vs. St. Michaels of Vt. 
B. Linnenberger vs. Portland Univ. 
B. Linnenberger vs. Adams State 



1/14/57 


39 


(FG: 15 FT: 9) 


1/14/57 


15 


(No. attempts 29) 


2/ 2/57 


13 


(No. attempts 17) 


1/10/57 


18 


(No. by team 62) 



OWN TEAM HIGH MARKS 

Field Goals Scored vs. Western State 41 

Free throws attemp vs. Colo. A&M 48 

Free throws scored vs. Colo. A&M 35 

Personal fouls vs. Western State 29 



LOW MARKS BY OPPONENTS 

Field goals Scored by Air Force Aca 15 

Free throws attempt by Colo. Mines 15 

Free throws scored by Portland 7 

Personal Fouls against by Colo. Mines 10 

by Portland 





BOB LINNENBERGER 



DENNIS BOONE 




t »' 




gm 



I f 



1956-57 Ranger Varsity 



Rear — Coach Moore, Alan Hower; Ted Sermonet; Jim Butler; Bob Linnenberger; Terry Sheehy; Asst. Coach Titus. 
Front — Garbella (manager); Dennis Boone; John Gat ens; Tom Hoogerwerf; Dick Eckhard; Bill Bollwerk. 





MAJOR TROUBLE 



SINGLE WING 






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1956-57 Ski Team 



Team — Rohn Herrick; Dennis Herrick; John Chambers; Ron Marold. Missing — Joe Dunn, Leo Cremins. 



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As a team unit, the Rangers 
engaged in three meets during 
the preceding year. In the first, 
at Winter Park, they placed sec- 
ond. In the second, against 
such schools as Arizona U., Ida- 
ho U., Nevada U., and others of 
that caliber, they were able to 
place a strong second. After 
returning from this meet at 
Alta, Utah, they returned to 
their last meet at Climax. In 
that meet they placed second 
against more of the same high- 
quality opposition. 

During the interim between 
meets, the members of the team 
often skiied individually in dif- 
ferent contests. In these meets 
they distinguished themselves 
as athletes of no small merit. 




JOHN CHAMBERS BEFORE JUMP 



ROHN HERRICK ON SLALOM 




AS DENNIS HERRICK SOARS, SO SOAR RANGER HOPES 





COURAGEOUS RANGER AFTER BOMBING AIR FORCE 
ACADEMY 



GOD'S COUNTRY— CROSS COUNTRY 




TWO-POINT PERFECTION 





GRACEFUL DENNIS 



ROHN HERRICK AND LEO CREMINS 







■ ■ 




THE MIGHTY SANDOVAL 



Softball Intraorals 



HARRINGTON RECUPERATING 




WETZEL AND BUGSY THE BEETLE 




, 








ORESKOVICH SEARCHES FOR RECEIVER; BRITT TRIES 

TO TACKLE HIM. 

ORESKOVICH— SLICKS— BRITT— WEST ENDERS 



MO O'HOLLEARN GRABS IN VAIN 
O'HOLLEARN— MO'S BOYS 



Intramural football 




CHAMPIONS— COLORADO SPRINGS 

REAR— SAMBOL, YACOBELLIS, CROAK, KEENAN. 

FRONT— ASH, STANKO, WETZEL. 



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THE LIBRARY HAS SOME VERY ATTRACTIVE 
FEATURES SUCH AS . . . 



"VARIOUS OBJECTS CAN CAUSE AN INTES- 
TINAL OBSTRUCTION, SUCH AS THIS 
SPHEROID EXHIBITED BY A BRAVES' FAN." 




THE MARINES HAVE SOME VERY AT- 
TRACTIVE FEATURES SUCH AS . . . 



"SUNSET 9-9850, AND REVERSE THE 
CHARGES" 



THE RANGER PLAYMATE OF THE 
MONTH WHOM WE MET IN A PHOTOG- 
RAPHY SHOP. 






HISTORY MAJOR DAN RIORDAN 
CATCHES UP WITH CURRENT EVENTS 
BY LISTENING TO KREG'S LEO SMITH 
AND THE NEWS. 



ROOMMATES RAY NASS AND TED 
SERMONET WITH THEffi PLAYMATES 
AT THE JUNIOR-SENIOR PROM. 




WHEN LIFE COMES TO LEO CREMINS 



FUTURE TEACHER OF AMERICA, MARGOR- 
ETTE DICKERSON SCANS THE OPPORTUNITY 
BOARD OUTSIDE THE PLACEMENT OFFICE. 



EACH NIGHT THERE IS A TWO HOUR PE- 
RIOD DURING WHICH UNDERCLASSMEN 
MAY STUDY OR EAT TWINKIES. 






GAD'. WHAT SENTIMENT. 



I LOVE BUTTERFLIES! 




BIG CITY NEWSROOM. 



WE'RE NOT CRAZY WE JUST ACT THAT WAY. 



YOU HAVEN'T SEEN NOTHIN' YET. 



GAD! WHAT SENTIMENT. 





_ chenlei) 

\ tlltX 




LOOK SHARP! FEEL SHARP! BE CAREFUL! 



ROOMS ARE CHECKED PERIODICALLY FOR 
CLEANLINESS AND ORDER. 



YOU'RE 
KIDDING. 




A JOLLY GOOD SHOT BUT DOWN BOY! 



A JOLLY GOOD SHOT BUT DOWN GIRL! 






HEY! WHAT'S THE IDEA OF TURNING LAW- 
RENCE WELK OFF? 



IT SAYS HERE THAT THE PRINCIPLE OF 
DOUBLE EFFECT CAN BE APPLIED TO 
CRIBBING . . . 




SETTING OUT FOR THE RED ONION AND SKIING. 



IT'S FROM MY DAD ... HE NEEDS SOME MORE MONEY. 









i* nrmi 



W 




WICK AND SERMONET IN THE CHILD PSYCHOLOGY 
LABORATORY. 



CHEMICALLY SPEAKING . . . ECONOMICALLY SPEAKING 
... AS SHAKESPEARE WOULD SAY, "ME THINKS THE 
BOOKLET IS A FORTNIGHT OVERDUE." 




"YOU'VE GOT TO HAVE HEART" 



HEAD COACH GrVES A STRATEGY LECTURE BEFORE THE 
BIG REGIS-LORETTO GAME. 



THE BIG GAME SEES REGIS LOSING. 



DO YOU THINK THEY SUSPECT A ROOM CHECK, FATHER? 






REGIS FOOTBALL TEAM PRACTICING BEFORE THE BIG 
GAME WITH LORETTO HEIGHTS. 



BILLY GRAHAM ADDRESSING THE STUDENT BODY DURING 
THE ANNUAL RANGER REVIVAL. 




CAMPUS COP PICTURED ENROUTE TO BREAKING UP CAS- 
UAL ACQUAINTANCE. 



THE BIG GAME WITH LORETTO HEIGHTS. 



THAT'S ONE OF THE MOST EMPHATIC "NO'S" HE'S EVER 
GIVEN! 



ON THE NOT SO . . . SUNNY SIDE OF THE STREET! 







I SAY THERE OLD BOY . . 




AIN'T THEY SWEET! 




STUDENT COUNCIL WORKS WITH PUBLIC HEALTH 




THANK YOU, MOLLY MAYFIELD! 




"TILT" 




IS THAT YOUR STUTZ-BEARCAT PARKED IN THE 
GYMNASIUM? 




THE W.C.T.U. LISTENS TO A GUEST SPEAKER AT THE RE- 
GIONAL CONVENTION. 



■ I 

1- 




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■ s 


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THE HEALTHY HEART WIMP BRICKELL FAMILY EATS 
WHEATIES! 

DO YOU HAVE "TIRED BLOOD?" 




Cpliague 



It was stated in the foreword to the 1957 RANGER that these are indeed the best years of our lives, 
for because of them all the coming ones will be better. 

As the importance and population of the western states spiral upwards, Regis is growing to meet the 
needs which will soon arise, as more and more young men approaching maturity seek the privilege of a 
Jesuit College education. 

To accommodate the growing demands, the courageous Regis development program was begun. 

Included in the immediate plans are a new dormitory, student union, faculty residence, field house, library 

and science building. 

Even as this is being written, husky suntanned men in blue and white coveralls are fighting the 

twin enemies of time and weather in converting the one-time dream of a new residence hall for two hundred 

students into a reality of red brick, glass and steel. 

On the vast prairie that was once west campus, a new student center is beginning to take form, as 
man and machine struggle to make it ready before Christmas. 

But while physical power continues to mold the elements of the earth into magnificent new edifices, 
mental power must continue to plan and administrate. The problems of financing, construction, archi- 
tecture, campus planning and landscaping are a few of the many obstacles which were met and partially 
conquered in this year of 1957. 

So also, it is seen that these years spent in planning, building, and development are the best years 
of Regis' life, for because of them, the coming years shall see more and more young men receiving a true 
education, one which develops the whole man — mentally, physically, morally, emotionally, socially. 



*lna Ran^e/i, £tafy 



PATRONS 



Thomas L. Arms 

4140 Garfield Ave. So. 

Minneapolis, Minnesota 

Joseph A. Ash 

2424 N. Tejon St. 

Colorado Springs, Colorado 

IsAr. & Mrs. Biddinger 
4606 W. 35th 
Denver, Colorado 

Mr. & Mrs. N. T. Brown 
Thermopolis, Wyoming 

Mr. & Mrs. E. D. Bowen 
531 N. Central 
University City, Missouri 

J. B. Brooks 
4032 W. 50th 
Denver, Colorado 

Gilbert Buckley 
5606 St. Louis Ave. 
St. Louis, Missouri 

Mildred Cerrone 
Denver, Colorado 

Mr. & Mrs. Fred Chiolero 
2825 Depew 
Denver, Colorado 

Mr. & Mrs. Earle M. Cline 
4116 A So. Grand Blvd. 
St. Louis, Missouri 

Mr. & Mrs. L. P. Cremins 
731 1 Pershing 
University City, Missouri 

Mrs. James E. Dornoff 
3316 N. 51st Blvd. 
Milwaukee 16, Wisconsin 

hAr. Ron Dornoff 
3316 N. 51st Blvd. 
Milwaukee 16, Wisconsin 

Mr. & Mrs. Gaston Erramouspe 

108 2nd Street 

Rock Springs, Wyoming 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph E. Fehringer 
Peetz, Colorado 



Dennis Foley 
1010 S. Elizabeth 
Denver 9, Colorado 

Paul J. Foley 
61 Mission Road 
Wichita, Kansas 

Mr. & Mrs. Frank S. Foti 
5047 N. Bay Ridge 
Whitefish Bay 17, Wisconsin 

Freshman Class 
Loretto Heights College 
Loretto, Colorado 

Mr. J. F. Gallegos 
La Jara, Colorado 

Dr. & Mrs. H. E. Graham 
71 Park Lane Drive 
Galesburg, Illinois 

John Hartmeyer 
Hamilton Park, 
Muncie, Indiana 

Mrs. Frances Hower 
235 Datura 
Littleton, Colorado 

Dr. C. H. Lindeman 
41 26 A Shreve Ave. 
St. Louis 1 5, Missouri 

Otto Luethy 
5045 Eliot 
Denver, Colorado 

Mr. & Mrs. Thomas F. Maher 

6332 Bancroft 

St. Louis 9, Missouri 

Alfonse Marcotte 
1 10 Baker 
Salina, Kansas 

Mr. & Mrs. M. J. McColm 
428 Camino Del Monte Sol 
Santa Fe, New Mexico 

Mr. & Mrs. M. J. McDermott 
3517 Delgony Street 
Denver 5, Colorado 

A Friend 



Manuel Rosado Mendez 
Box 702 Rio Piedras 
Puerto Rico 

L. P. Merk! 

4437 W. 38th Ave. 

Denver 12, Colorado 

Mr. & Mrs. Louis J. Miller 
7766 Gissler Ave. 
Richmond Heights, Missouri 

Mr. & Mrs. Clarence Mueller 
New Baden, ILIIinois 

Frank J. Muench 
1390 Blue Ridge Blvd. 
Elm Grove, Wisconsin 

Frank Nemeth 
4207 Homeriee Ave. 
East Chicago, Indiana 

tAr. and Mrs. Leonard Nickels 
Rural Route No. 3, Box 339 
Aurora, Illinois 

William E. Perry 
4922 Lowell Blvd. 
Denver, Colorado 

Hector J. Perucca 
4212 Wyandot St. 
Denver 1 1, Colorado 

Dr. & Mrs. Henry C. Pfeffle 
3345 Union Road 
St. Louis 23, Missouri 

Harry Quadracci 
7400 Maple Terrace 
Wautatosa 13, Wisconsin 

Mr. and Mrs. Lut Rotter 
7606 Alicia 
Maplewood 17, Missouri 

Mr. & Mrs. W. C. Ruoff 
6075 Cabanne PI. 
St. Louis 12, Missouri 



Norman B. Scott 
758 North Broadway 
Milwaukee, Wisconsin 

Mr. & Mrs. Ted Sermonet, Sr. 
3045 N. Bartlett Ave. 
Milwaukee, Wisconsin 

F. R. Staley 
1235 So. Utica 
Tulsa, Oklahoma 

Mr. & Mrs. Leo Smithisler 
820 North Cedar 
Colorado Springs, Colorado 

Mr. Joseph Tarabina 
Trinidad, Colorado 

Mrs. June W. Valiant 
2742 So. Zenobia 
Denver, Colorado 

Mr. Vitale 
5040 N. Federal 
Denver, Colorado 

Mr. & Mrs. Meredith Wetzel 
7524 Carondelet 
St. Louis 5, Missouri 

Robert A. Wick 

7030 West North Ave. 

Wauwatosa 13, Wisconsin 

Opal Wolfe 
3503 Tennyson St. 
Denver 12, Colorado 

Mr. & Mrs. L. M. Woodward 
325 Krameria 
Denver 20, Colorado 

Mrs. Mary Yacobellis 
217 EldertSt. 
Brooklyn 7, New York 

A Friend 

A Friend 



Compliments 



WILLIAM J. M'DONOU 

9421 So. Winchester Ave. 
Chicago 20, III. 



Auto Accessories 

Washing - Lubrication 

Pick Up and Delivery Service 



ASHKER'S 




SERVICE 



4800 Lowell Blvd. 
Denver, Colorado 



Joseph R. Ashker, Prop. GL. 7529 



ngs! 



THE TIFFIN 

1730 South Colorado Boulevard 



Compliments 
of 

& C. WHOLESALE CO. 



er 



Donald Cullen 



Eames Bros. 


C. B. Gilliland Arthur Rose Raymond H. Farley 


PRINTERS 


DRESS PROPERLY 


Printers of Quality and Service 


FOR SPECIAL AFFAIRS 




We Rent Dress Suits 




for 


We Specialize in 


PROMS - WEDDINGS 




FORMAL EVENTS 


DODGERS, LETTERHEADS, STATEMENTS, 




ENVELOPES, BUSINESS CARDS, DIRECT 


Complete Line of 
Accessories 


MAIL, ADVERTISING, ETC. 






G. B. Gilliland and Co. 


Phone AComa 2-4637 


Formal Wear — Rentals and Sales 


2030 Champa St. 


1029- 17th STREET 




DENVER 


DENVER, COLORADO 


KEystone 4-3585 



NORTHWESTERN TRANSFER CO, 

134 N. Young St. 
Milwaukee 1, Wis. 



• • • 



Local - Intercity - Interstate 
Trucking Contractors 



MARY LOU 




AND 




MOON 


WILFRED EYRE 


DRIVE INNS 


100 South Franklin 


FINE FOOD 


Denver 9, Colorado 


5501 E. COLFAX AVE. 




PHONE FLorida 5-0375 


* 



1 

1 

JOHNNIE MARINO'S 


LOG CABIN INN 


3109 Federal Blvd. 


ALWAYS A FRIEND OF REGIS 


i| SERVING THE BEST IN FOOD AND DRINKS 


LOG CABIN 


Hours: 7 A.M. to 2 A.M. Daily 


8 A.M. to 8 P.M. Sundays 


[ GL 5-9846 


• 
COMPLIMENTS 




OF 






Mr. and Mrs. Thos. H. Walrond 


SAMBOL PACKING 


19 Clayton Terrace 


COMPANY 


Clayton, Missouri 


KANSAS CITY, KANSAS 









COMPLIMENTS 


Regis Is a School With a Heart- 




OF 


May She Always Be That V/ay 
COMPLIMENTS 




Mr. and Mrs. Parnell T. Quinn 


OF 




116 Concourse East 


S. W. O'NEAL 

7167 Washington 




Brightwaters, N.Y. 


University City 5, Mo, 




FROZEN FOOD TO GO PHONE GLendale 5-9973 
Denver's Original 


KINGS COURT LOUNGE 




JIM'S PIZZERIA 


AND RESTAURANT 




"King of Pizza Pie" 






Italian Spaghetti — Home Made Ravioli — Lasagna 
Orders to Go! 


AN OASIS BETWEEN REGIS 
AND LORETTO HEIGHTS. 




Open Daily 4 p.m. till 2 a.m. 


1000 So. Federal Blvd. 




Sundays 4 p.m. till Midnight 


Phone WEst 4-9688 




Closed Mondays 


Jimmy Lorell 




COMPLIMENTS OF 


FEHR'S FLOWERS 




THE LOWELL PHARMACY 


In Cavaleri's Mart 

1948 W. 48th at Tejon 




4901 Lowell Blvd. 


• 

SMARTLY STYLED CORSAGES 




GR. 7-1108 


GR. 7-2367 


j 


MARIGOLD CAFE 


COMPLIMENTS 




REAL ITALIAN FOOD 
Italian Pizza Pie 


of 




BEER -WINE 
MIXED DRINKS 


THE EL FIDEL HOTELS 

Santa Fe 




4100 Tejon Street 






Phone GL. 5-9859 


Las Vegas Albuquerque 





Iw! 



Silk Importer 



France 



italy 



Switzerland 



105 W40th 



New York, N.Y. 



4949 Lowell 



Compliments of 



O'MEARA FORD 



* iftr tV 



1 1 00 W Colfax Ave. AC 2-8581 



Compliments of 

TULAGIS 



Boulder 



Colorado 



BRIGHTEN YOUR 

OUTLOOK ON GOING FORMAL 

SEE 

THE NEWEST IN INDIVIDUAL 
TONES IN DINNER JACKETS 



1?andalte 



1611 Glenarm 




AM 6-0608 






DINE OUT 



QUALITY 





BEEF - PORK - PROVISIONS 










Sausage our Specialty 




Try the EDELWEISS 




Phone 




1517 


Where eating is fun! 




AC 2-5709 




Market St. 








DENVER, COLORADO 




1644 Glenarm Place 


AC. 2-0700 



Compliments of 
A GOOD FRIEND AND NEIGHBOR TO REGIS, 

BILLY'S INN 

We serve the finest in food and drinks 

The corner of 44th and Lowell 
Only 6 blocks from the campus 



A FRIEND OF REGIS 



MAX MOSKO'S MOTEL 



Compliments 

OF 



826 W. 2nd Street 



SIOUX FALLS, SO. DAKOTA 



Compliments 
of 

NORTH DENVER ALIGNMENT 

4369 Stuart 

DENVER, COLORADO 
GL 5-6118 



SAVE TIME 
LAUNDRYETTE 

Clothes washed, fluff dry and folded 
Dry Cleaning— Shirt Finishing 

4224 Tennyson St. 
Phone GR 7-0631 



COMPLIMENTS 
OF 

EMMA JEAN DRESS SHOP 

2736 West 55th Street 
WA 5-4410 

Prop., Mr. and Mrs. D. Lupori 



JACK AND TEENY'S 
BAR AND GRILL 

BEST IN FOOD & DRINK 
FREE POPCORN 

KNOWN TO REGIS MEN 

AS 

"SUNNYSIDE" 

4407 W. 52nd Ave., Denver 




1552 Market 

Denver, Colo. 

IA 5-2221 

UNUSUAL FOOD GIFTS FROM 
Rocky Mountain Area 

Pascal Celery — Cheese 

Trout — Candy — Fruit Baskets 

Anholt Safety Ashtrays 

-WRITE OR CALL- 




Hi SPORTSMAN INN 



DINE -DANCE -DRINK 



COMPLIMENTS 



of 



PEPSI-COLA BOTTLING CO. 

of 

DENVER 



3739 Brighton Blvd. 



Denver 5. Colorado 



COMPLIMENTS 



FROM 



MOUNT ST. FRANCIS 

Colorado Springs, Colorado 



DOYLE'S 
PHARMACY 

The Particular Druggist 

17th AVE. and GRANT 
KE. 4-5987 FREE DELIVERY 



MOUNTAIN LOUNGE 

DANCING BAND 
FRIDAY-SATURDAY 

BEST IN FOODS 

1779 Morrison Road 



DENVER GOLF 
AND TENNIS 

1807 WELTON ST. 
DENVER, COLORADO 



ERNIE'S SUPPER CLUB 

THE 

FINEST IN FOOD AND DRINKS 

WHERE REGIS MEN MEET 

- AN IDEAL PLACE FOR THAT BANQUET - 

1/2 BLOCK OFF FEDERAL ON 44TH 




See 

Bob Fisher 

AT 

Murphy-Ma honey 



FOR YOUR 
Sweet, Smooth, and Sassy New 
CHEVROLET 

OPEN EVENINGS 

MURPHY-MAHONEY 

GL 5-4747 
2986 No. Speer Blvd. 

35 YEARS SAME OWNER - SAME LOCATION 



DINE FINE 



THE OLD NAVARRE 



1727 Tremont 



Denver, Colorado 



Your success depends upon the 
inner security you feel when you 
are faultlessly attired . . . when 
every accessory correlates. 

Anderson's specializes in ward- 
robe fundamentals and acces- 
sories in good taste ... at modest 
prices. 




4 Buell Mall 



Cherry Creek 



EA 2-7170 



GOOD LUCK REGIS! 

Compliments 
of 

JOHNNY HARPER 

Arvada's only FORD Dealer 



SPECIAL THANKS ON BEHALF OF THE RANGER STAFF 

TO THE BROTHERS 

OF IOTA CHAPTER OF 

ALPHA DELTA GAMMA 
NATIONAL CATHOLIC SOCIAL FRATERNITY 

WHO BY THEIR AMBITION AND COOPERATION 
MADE THIS YEARBOOK POSSIBLE 






Newsfoto Publishing Company 

is grateful for 

your patronage and recognizes 

the role you have played 

in the development of its plant. 

In return 

it shall continue to serve you 

with full sensibility of 

your confidence in its ability to print 

your yearbook; 

and its continuing aim is to 

justify that confidence. 





NEWSFOTO PUBLISHING CO. 
San Angelo, Texas 







8- JJ 



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